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Wednesday, May 22, 2019

OSU Extension News January 3 2019

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Co-Parenting for Resilience Divorce or separation is not an easy or favorable decision, especially when minor children are in the home.  A class is available for divorcing or separating parents with minor children living in the home.  My next class is scheduled for 1 p.m. Tuesday, January 8, 2019. Pre-registration is required. Call Jefferson County OSU Extension Office at 580-228-2332 for registration information.  This class is mandatory by law in Oklahoma and is also valuable for Grandparents and other relatives of minor children going through a divorce or separation.

Jefferson County OHCE will meet at 12 noon, 3rd Tuesdays, at the Waurika Sr. Citizens Center.  Our next meeting will be Tuesday, January 15.  Tara Brown, Jefferson County OSU Extension Educator, FCS/4-H Youth Development will present a program on “Cooking Under Pressure” using an Instant Pot.  Come join us!

Electric Pressure Cookers:

I bought myself an Instant Pot for Christmas and the few times I have used it; I really enjoy the “one-pot meals”!  I have made Beef Stroganoff; My version of Smothered steak; and a Deer (Venison) chili.  Browning the meat, adding seasonings and liquid and cooked all in one pot made it a lot easier and nicer to cleanup!  There are several brands of the electric pressure cooker; I am not promoting any particular brand (I bought myself an Instant Pot because I found it on sale!).  I do find the electric pressure cooker takes up counter space where I used to keep my Slow Cooker.  However, for many of the recipes I enjoy, the quickness of preparing, cooking and ready to serve in less than 45 minutes – and don’t forget – all in one pot – makes it a pretty handy appliance.

For those who received an electric pressure cooker, here is a recipe I made and liked. If you prefer, you may use all beef or a mixture of beef and ground turkey in place of the venison. Seasonings may be adjusted to your preference.

Jefferson County 4H News

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Saturday, December 8 – Waurika Christmas Parade (Jefferson County 4-H will decorate our float Monday, November 26; Tuesday, November 27 and Wednesday, November 28).  We will begin at 4 p.m. each day.  

Saturday, December 15 – Share-the-Fun will begin at 2 p.m. at Ryan Public School.  Please register by November 30 to Jefferson County OSU Extension Office – 580-228-2332.

Monday, December 17 – “4-H Kids Cooking in the Kitchen” (Holiday Sweets) – 4:30 p.m. -5:30 p.m. at Jefferson County OSU Extension Office.

Wednesday, March 6 – Saturday, March 9 – Jefferson County Jr. Livestock Show

Saturday, April 6 – Jefferson County Communication Contest (speeches, Illustrated Talks, Demonstrations) 1 p.m. at Jefferson County OSU Extension Office.

Saturday, May 11 – Jefferson County Cupcake Wars – 11:00 a.m. at Jefferson County OSU Extension office.

REMINDER:

To participate in 4-H events and activities, including showing livestock, you must be enrolled in the 2018-2019 enrollment period which began September 1.  Enrollment is completed online by the family at ok.4honline.com    There is a state 4-H program fee; there is no charge for Adult volunteers.

If you need assistance, contact Jefferson County OSU Extension office at 580-228-2332.

We are looking for adult volunteers for 4-H Clubs!  We have youth interested in joining 4-H and need adults to be leaders.  Call 580-228-2332 for more information.

CLOVER BOWL TRIVIA QUESTION:  In what city did 4-H first begin in Oklahoma?

Answer:  Tishomingo

OSU Extension News

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OHCE (Oklahoma Home and Community Education)

The Jefferson County OHCE will meet Tuesday, November 20 at 11:30 a.m. at the Waurika Sr. Citizens Center.  Come to eat lunch with us, stay and listen to our program “Repurposed Jars” presented by Tara Brown, Jefferson County OSU Extension Educator, FCS/4-H Youth Development.  OHCE is open to any person who wishes to join.  Melicia McFadden is our president and Deborah Farrar is our treasurer.  

Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance

Tai chi: Moving for Better Balance is an evidence-based program that focuses on improving functional ability, such as balance and physical function, to reduce fall-related risks and frequency.  

The series of slow continuous movements of Tai chi: Moving for Better Balance help those participating reduce stress, increase balance and flexibility as well as learn relaxation to improve their overall mind, body, and spirit. Tai chi: Moving for Better Balance is for people at all levels of mobility and can be done while sitting. Tara Brown recently received her certification through the Injury Prevention Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health to teach this program.

The class is held at 9:30 a.m. Mondays through November 19th (and longer if requested), at the Ringling Community Building.  We have begun a Thursday evening class from 5 p.m. – 6 p.m. also at the Ringling Community Building. There is no cost to participate; come to join us!

Co-Parenting for Resilience:  Divorce or separation is not an easy or favorable decision, especially when minor children are in the home.  A class is available for divorcing or separating parents with minor children living in the home.  My next class is scheduled for 1 p.m. Tuesday, December 11, 2018. Pre-registration is required. Call Jefferson County OSU Extension Office at 580-228-2332 for registration information.  This class is mandatory by law in Oklahoma and is also valuable for Grandparents and other relatives of minor children going through a divorce or separation.

Holiday Cooking under Pressure was presented by Tara Brown, Extension Educator for Family and Consumer Sciences/4-H Youth Development Wednesday, November 7 at the Ringling Community Building.  Tara spoke on the “fairly new” concept of cooking with Electric Pressure Cookers. There are several models from Instant Pot to Crock Pot to Power Pressure and more; each with the concept of using one pot to cook with pressure (like the Pressure cookers we use for the top of the stove) to slow cooking all in one pot. Tara prepared Beef Stroganoff in one cooker and Cinnamon Apple Slices in another.  Sample tastings and recipes were provided to the group of 16.  

Keep your pets safe during winter weather.

For pets that spend a good deal of time romping in the backyard or lounging in a patch of sunshine on the deck, the arrival of winter may be a rude awakening and cause of concern for safety.

Before Oklahoma experiences a deep freeze, pet owners need to make sure their pets are well-cared for when the temperature begins to fall, said Dr. Paul DeMars, associate professor in Community Practice at the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences at Oklahoma State University.

“As pretty and soft as your pet’s fur is, it isn’t necessarily the perfect insulator, especially when the temperatures are extreme or when the fur gets wet,” DeMars said. “Compare it to being outside wearing a t-shirt when it’s below freezing. Your pet’s toes, nose and ears are especially susceptible to winter weather, too.”

If you suspect your pet has frostbite, cover the animal with warm towels. Gently pat dry the affected area and contact your veterinarian.

While winter weather can be hard on any pet, very young animals, as well as older dogs and cats, should not be kept outdoors. DeMars said these young pets simply do not have the fat, metabolism or the full fur coat they need to stay warm.

The best option for pet safety during the winter is to keep them indoors. If your pet lives outside fulltime, it is imperative to provide adequate shelter from the elements. A covered enclosure with blankets or clean hay/straw/cedar shavings is a must. Another option is a heated floor mat. Check with your local pet store to see what is available.

 

Tara Brown at the Ringling Community Center talking about cooking under pressure. She is explaining the use of electric pressure cookers.

“Try to face the opening of the shelter away from the wind. Also, if it rains and the bedding gets wet, replace it with dry bedding,” DeMars said. “Wet bedding can grow bacteria and mold, which are not healthy for your pet.”

It is no secret exercise is good for both humans and their pets. For those who enjoy a nice walk with your pet, sidewalks and walking trails are likely to have been salted if there is ice or snow on the ground. While this is beneficial for humans to help keep them from slipping and sliding, salt can cause irritation on an animal’s foot pads.

Not only is the weather a concern for your pet, but the chances of exposing your pet to life-threatening chemicals also increases. Leaky radiators can leave pools of antifreeze in your driveway and is both a winter and summer issue. Although the sweet taste of antifreeze is appealing to your pet, it can be deadly, even in very small doses.

“Antifreeze is highly toxic and absorbs quickly into your pet’s system. The kidneys are the most affected organs and can shut down completely within 12 to 24 hours in cats and 36 to 72 hours in dogs,” DeMars said.

Tara Brown, Extension Educator for Family and Consumer Sciences/4-H Youth Development.

Another outdoor danger is animals who seek protection from the winter weather in dangerous places. Before starting and moving your vehicle, check under the hood and in the wheel wells to ensure there are no animals hiding.

Because it takes a few more calories to keep warm in the winter, your pet may need a little extra food. For pets who stay outside, make sure the water in their water bowls is not frozen.

“Winter weather will mean your pets require a little extra care to ensure their safety,” DeMars said.

Story by Trisha Gedon

Communications Specialist

Agricultural Communications Services

159 Ag North

Stillwater, OK  74078

405-744-3625

trisha.gedon@okstate.edu 

OSU Extension News October 25 2018

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Co-Parenting for Resilience:  Divorce or separation is not an easy or favorable decision, especially when minor children are in the home.  A class is available for divorcing or separating parents with minor children living in the home.  My next class is scheduled for 1 p.m. Tuesday, November 13, 2018. Pre-registration is required. Call Jefferson County OSU Extension Office at 580-228-2332 for registration information.  This class is mandatory by law in Oklahoma and is also valuable for Grandparents and other relatives of minor children going through a divorce or separation.

OHCE (Oklahoma Home and Community Education)

The Jefferson County OHCE met Tuesday, October 16 at 11:30 a.m. at the Waurika Sr. Citizens Center.  Present were Melicia McFadden, president, Genevieve Hogstad, Rubye Benson, Carolyn Arnold, secretary, Rose Yeager, guest, Tara Brown, advisor, and Pat McGriff, member who presented our lesson on “Essential Oils”.  Pat gave informative information on Essential Oils and many uses for them.  Some were for calming, relaxing; some were for energy and others blended could be an aid to various aches, pains and other purposes.  Our next meeting will be Tuesday, November 20; we will meet at the Waurika Sr. Citizens Center about 12 noon.  Come eat lunch with us, stay and listen to our program “Repurposed Jars” presented by Tara Brown, Jefferson County OSU Extension Educator, FCS/4-H Youth Development.  

Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance

Tai chi: Moving for Better Balance is an evidence-based program that focuses on improving functional ability, such as balance and physical function, to reduce fall-related risks and frequency.  

The series of slow continuous movements of Tai chi: Moving for Better Balance help those participating reduce stress, increase balance and flexibility as well as learn relaxation to improve their overall mind, body and spirit. 

Tai chi: Moving for Better Balance is for people at all levels of mobility and can be done while sitting. Tara Brown recently received her certification through the Injury Prevention Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health to teach this program.

The class will be held at 9:30 a.m. Mondays beginning October 15th through November 12th, at the Gleason Memorial Library located at 101 E. Main, Ringling.

Your Jefferson County OSU Extension office staff: Leland McDaniel, Extension Educator, AG/4-H Youth Development; Tara Brown, Extension Educator, FCS/4-H Youth Development and Linda Whitsett, Administrative Support Specialist may be contacted at 580-228-2332 for additional programs.

Jeffco 4H News

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 4-H Enrollment – for year 2018-2019 Open began September 1

September 1 began the 4-H enrollment year 2018-2019. Families are encouraged to enroll online.  Go to ok.4honline.com to update your family profile page.  If you are re-enrolling from last year, DO NOT CREATE A NEW PROFILE.  If you have not been previously enrolled online, you will need to create your family profile page.  If you need assistance, call us at 580-228-2332. If you wish, you may use one of our computers here in the office. 

 4-H members must be active a minimum of 90 days before they can show in the spring Livestock Show.

Volunteers also need to re-enroll and check the box for volunteer verification to have a background check conducted.  This will not cost you.  If you have difficulties contact our office for assistance.

CLOVER BOWL TRIVIA QUESTION:  In what year was the National 4-H Center in Chevy Chase, Maryland, established?

Answer:  1959

Tara Brown, Jefferson County OSU Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences/4-H Youth Development has had the fun opportunity to participate in the Ringling Elementary and Middle School BDAT.  Thursday, October 4 the younger group (K-2) were given a paper pumpkin to color and write down what they learned about pumpkins.  For example: Pumpkins in the field by be White, Green, Yellow, Red or Orange.  The students knew some of the uses of pumpkin – pumpkin pie, roasted pumpkin seeds, and of course the Jack O’ lantern!  This is a very excited and eager group of students!  Some know the 4-H pledge and what each H stands for – others are trying to learn.

Group 3rd – 8th grade students learned a little more about 4-H and a special event to be held Saturday, December 15 – Jefferson County 4-H Share-the-Fun!

Those participating must be actively enrolled in 4-H.  If you need assistance enrolling your child online at ok.4honline.com please call 580-228-2332 and we will assist you!

The students also learned some about rockets. We pretended there was a group of students stranded on an island and needed water and food.  The question was “how do we get food and water to them?  It’s too dangerous for a boat to go to the island.

The students worked in teams to build their “rocket”; they had to determine what size nose-cone to put on as well as number of fins and where to place them with limited available supplies.  After a short period of time, it was time to “launch” their rockets to determine which team’s rocket went the highest; which went the farthest and which one was closest to the target.

The Launch Pads’ rocket flew the highest (30 ft.) and farthest (51ft.)  The Rocket Builders’ rocket landed closest to the middle of the target.  Other crews included:  Blue Crew; The Rockets and The Blue Bloods.  The students discussed why they thought one rocket flew farther while another landed closest to the target; many possibilities included the size of the launch pad; how it was angled; number and placement of the fins and how they were attached.  The students seemed to really enjoy this activity!

Plans for a near future will include making Pumpkin Pie in a Bag which will include team work, measuring, mixing and tasting!

Have a good week and don’t forget to enroll in 4-H online to be able to participate in the 4-H Share-the-Fun and to show in the Spring Jr. Livestock show.

OSU Extension News October 11 2018

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Co-Parenting for Resilience:  Divorce or separation is not an easy or favorable decision, especially when minor children are in the home.  A class is available for divorcing or separating parents with minor children living in the home.  My next class is scheduled for 1 p.m. Tuesday, November 13, 2018. Pre-registration is required. Call Jefferson County OSU Extension Office at 580-228-2332 for registration information.  This class is mandatory by law in Oklahoma and is also valuable for Grandparents and other relatives of minor children going through a divorce or separation.

Jefferson County OHCE will meet Tuesday, October 16 at 12:30 p.m. at the Jefferson County OSU Extension office located at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds.  Lesson on “Essential Oils” will be presented by Pat McGriff.  Light food will be available.  Our November meeting will be held at 1 p.m. Tuesday, November 20.  The lesson “Repurposed Jars” will be presented by Tara Brown and will include a “You Make and Take” item – bring a clean empty pint-size jar.  Call 580-228-2332 for additional information.   Deborah Farrar is our Treasurer and is accepting dues at this time.

October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month

“October 2004 was the first National Cybersecurity Awareness Month. At that time, Facebook was less than a year old and neither the iPhone nor the Samsung Galaxy existed. In 2018, cybersecurity is more than just remembering to update antivirus software and recognizing a phishing attempt. Cybersecurity attacks continuously threaten our nation’s critical infrastructure, including transportation, utilities, public health, and financial services. Plus, the more that we integrate technology into our lives, the more vulnerable we become to cybersecurity threats.”

Tara Brown, Jefferson County OSU Extension Educator for Family & Consumer Sciences/4-H Youth Development recently attended the 2018 National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences (NEAFCS) conference in San Antonio, Texas.  Oklahoma had 31 delegates.  Tara is a member of the Financial Team which received three awards at the Southern Region level and two awards at the National level.  There were many workshops on using Social Media to getting information out to our public.  If you are a Facebook user, you will find Jefferson County OSU Extension at JeffersonCounty Osu Extension; Jefferson County 4-H page is JeffersonCounty Fourh.

We post information of interest – look us up!

Of course, you may contact our office at 580-228-2332 if you have questions.

Jefferson County 4H News September 27 2018

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4-H Enrollment – for year 2018-2019 Open began September 1

September 1 began the 4-H enrollment year 2018-2019. Families are encouraged to enroll online.  Go to ok.4honline.com to update your family profile page.  If you are re-enrolling from last year, DO NOT CREATE A NEW PROFILE.  If you have not been previously enrolled online, you will need to create your family profile page.  If you need assistance, call us at 580-228-2332. If you wish, you may use one of our computers here in the office. 

 4-H members must be active a minimum of 90 days before they can show in the spring Livestock Show.

Volunteers also need to re-enroll and check the box for volunteer verification to have a background check conducted.  This will not cost you.  If you have difficulties contact our office for assistance.

CLOVER BOWL TRIVIA QUESTION:  What year was the four-leave clover chosen as the symbol for 4-H?

Answer:  1911

The 2018 National 4-H Week is nearly a month away. National 4-H week is set for Oct. 7-13. This year’s theme is “Inspire Kids to Do” which focuses on how 4-H grows youth into true leaders. We want to highlight Oklahoma 4-H doers during the month of October. If you have a 4-H member who is doing something awesome to benefit others/their communities, in their project work, to make a difference, feel free to share their story with me and we would love to feature them on our social media outlets to celebrate National 4-H Week!

Jeffco COOP News September 27 2018

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Centenarians encouraged to participate in special registry project

The Oklahoma Centenarian and Family Life Registry offers an important opportunity to honor the lives and legacies of Oklahoma’s centenarians and translate their experiences into better health and longevity for the state. 

“Centenarians have amassed a lifetime of personal adversities, transitions, and triumphs,” associate professor Dr. Alex Bishop said. “Despite their societal contributions and the overall benefit to community public health initiatives that collecting information about their life experiences offers, these individuals are rarely recognized.” 

The Oklahoma Centenarian and Family Registry hopes to change that. A collaboration of the Oklahoma State University’s Gerontology Project, Centenarians of Oklahoma and the OSU Center for Family Resilience, the Oklahoma Centenarian and Family Life Registry project was developed both to honor centenarians, to preserve their family memories and individual legacies and to understand their continued survival. 

Any centenarian living in Oklahoma is eligible and encouraged to participate in an online survey accessible at https://okla.st/centenarian.

Questions can be directed to Dr. Alex Bishop by email alex.bishop@okstate.edu, or phone (405) 744-3898. 

Online 4-H Enrollment 2018-2019 began September 1, 2018.  If you know of a student age 8 and in the 3rd grade or older who is interested in joining 4-H, contact our office for instructions how to enroll online.  All students who are planning to show livestock in the Spring Livestock show must be actively enrolled in 4-H or FFA a minimum of 90 days prior to the Spring Jr. County Livestock Show (By the way, a member may enroll in 4-H and also be a FFA member).

Co-Parenting for Resilience:  Divorce or separation is not an easy or favorable decision, especially when minor children are in the home.  A class is available for divorcing or separating parents with minor children living in the home.  My next class is scheduled for 1 p.m. Tuesday, October 9, 2018. Pre-registration is required. Call Jefferson County OSU Extension Office at 580-228-2332 for registration information.  This class is mandatory by law in Oklahoma and is also valuable for Grandparents and other relatives of minor children going through a divorce or separation.

Jefferson County OHCE met Tuesday, September 18 at the Waurika Sr. Citizens Center.  Those present reviewed the recent County Fair and Quilt Turning and discussed how we could change to make our event even more exciting and inviting.  OHCE is open to any person interested in learning a variety of educational lessons as well as a good opportunity to get out of the home for a short period of time.  Upcoming events will include a Holiday Tea on December 18.  Programs for next year are in the works – if you are interested in joining us, Deborah Farrar is our Treasurer.

Cozy up to cold weather by preparing your home for fall and winter

It should not be too long until Oklahomans feel that distinct crispness in the air, which points to the arrival of college football season, otherwise known as fall. As conscientious consumers, homeowners can help ensure their homes are snug and warm this winter.

In Oklahoma, consumers spend about half of their energy dollars on heating and cooling. Concentrating efforts on increasing efficiency will go a long way toward saving big energy dollars.

A drafty home wastes energy, said Gina Peek, Oklahoma State University Cooperative Extension housing and consumer specialist.

“Things to consider include controlling the thermostat, sealing air leaks, having adequate insulation, having the HVAC system serviced and making certain that ductwork is not leaking,” Peek said.

The easiest thing to do is control the temperature with the thermostat. Set it up a little higher in the morning while you are getting ready for work or school, then have it automatically reset to a cooler temperature while everyone is gone for the day. Consumers can switch it manually, or you can consider getting a programmable thermostat, which is a tool homeowners can use to regulate energy use in their homes.

“A programmable thermostat can be a little bit of an investment initially but can save you money each year on your heating and cooling bills,” she said. “Whether you control the temperature manually or with a programmable unit, set the thermostat at a comfortable temperature when you’re awake at home, then set it to turn back 10 to 15 degrees when you go to work or to bed.”

Next, seal the air leaks in your home. Making sure there are not any air leaks in the home is so important for energy savings.

“Use caulk and foaming insulation to seal cracks and openings in your home. Weather stripping can be used around windows and doors,” Peek said. “While drafty windows and doors often come to mind, did you know you can lose valuable energy via cut-throughs for pipes, gaps around chimneys and recessed lighting, as well as unfinished spaces behind cupboards and closets? Expansion foam can be used in holes where pipes go through walls to cut down on lost air.”

One potential air leak area is the fireplace. Many people enjoy curling up to a blazing fire in the fireplace, but homeowners may be losing energy. Keep the fireplace damper closed unless a fire is burning to avoid warm air escaping up the chimney. Also, using tempered glass doors and a heat-air exchange system that blows warmed air back into the room can help cut energy costs.

Make certain your home has adequate insulation. Start in the attic. If you can see the rafters, you need to add more insulation. Insulation can shift and settle over time, so it is important to make certain you have enough.

Consider having your HVAC system serviced before it turns cold. It will help maintain the system’s efficiency and help prolong the lifespan.

Once your heating system has been checked out, it will be time to get your ducts in a row.

“Most people probably don’t think twice about the ductwork to their heating and cooling systems. It’s tucked away in the attic or under the floor, forgotten,” Peek said. “Homeowners don’t realize they can easily lose the conditioned air that moves through the duct system. Make sure the ducts are properly sealed and insulated to help conserve energy.”

Homeowners and renters can enjoy another energy saving tip: open the curtains on south-facing windows during the day to allow sunlight to naturally heat your home. Be sure to close the curtains at night.

 Finally, even though it is still a bit early to talk about Christmas lights – for some people anyway – use LED holiday light strings because they are more energy efficient.  “Many people will appreciate being able to save a little money on the utility bill during the holidays,” Peek said. “Just look for manufacturers and brands of ENERGY STAR-certified light strings.”

Jeffco Coop News September 13 2018

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Co-Parenting for Resilience:  Divorce or separation is not an easy or favorable decision, especially when minor children are in the home.  A class is available for divorcing or separating parents with minor children living in the home.  My next class is scheduled for 1 p.m. Monday, September 17, 2018. Pre-registration is required. Call Jefferson County OSU Extension Office at 580-228-2332 for registration information.  This class is mandatory by law in Oklahoma and is also valuable for Grandparents and other relatives of minor children going through a divorce or separation.

Jefferson County Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service through Oklahoma State University offers researched-based programs and information.  We assist with mailing and interpreting Soil Samples, Forage Samples, and some Water Samples.  If you have questions about plant diseases or why are your trees’ foliage falling off, or any other Agriculture, 4-H or Family and Consumer Sciences questions, call 580-228-2332 or come to 802 East D’ Street (Jefferson County Fairgrounds) and visit with Leland McDaniel, Extension Educator, Agriculture/ 4/H Youth Development and Tara Brown, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences/4-H Youth Development. 

Online 4-H Enrollment 2018-2019 began September 1, 2018.  If you know of a student age 8 and in the 3rd grade or older who is interested in joining 4-H, contact our office for instructions how to enroll online.  All students who are planning to show livestock in the Spring Livestock show must be actively enrolled in 4-H or FFA (By the way, a member may enroll in 4-H and also be a FFA member).

Tackle tailgates with Food Safety

Football season is here, and many fans are holding tailgates to cheer on their favorite teams. Oklahoma State University’s Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center wants to keep your food safe and recommends food safety tips for those participating in tailgating activities. 

“Roughly one out of six people get sick from foodborne illness,” said Ravi Jadeja, FAPC food safety specialist. “Following simple food safety procedures and reducing foodborne illness can keep many people from getting sick. With tailgating season upon us, it is important to remember proper food handling and cooking techniques so your tailgate does not sideline your guests.” 

Follow these tailgating food safety tips to ensure you have a fun and safe football season. 

Storing Perishable Foods

• Pack cooler with ice or frozen gel packs.

• Raw meats, pre-made dishes and leftovers need to go in the cooler.

• Store meats near the bottom of the cooler.

• Separate and securely wrap all cooler items.

Food Preparation 

• Use separate plates and cutting boards for raw and cooked proteins.

• Prevent cross-contamination by using separate utensils for each item.

• Use color-coded knives to help keep you organized.

• Wash utensils between uses.

Preparing the Grill

• Pre-heat gas or electric grills for 10-15 minutes before cooking.

• Pre-heat charcoals for 20-30 minutes before cooking.

• Pre-heating allows food to cook evenly.

• Never partially grill foods and then finish later.

Grilling Safety

• A food thermometer is the only reliable way to ensure food is safe to eat.

• Hamburgers and brats need to be at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit.

• Steaks and chops need to be at least 145 degrees Fahrenheit.

• If re-heating an item, such as pre-cooked hot dogs, cook to 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

• Chicken breasts need to be cooked to at least 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

Safety During and After Tailgating

• Keep hot foods hot, at least 140 degrees Fahrenheit.

• Keep cold foods cold, at least 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

• Throw away or put perishable foods in the cooler before heading to the game.

• Foods should not be left out for more than 1 hour if it is above 90 degrees Fahrenheit outside. 

• Place leftovers in shallow containers to prevent bacteria growth.

For more information about food safety, text FAPC to 80802 to download the free FAPC Connect app or visit www.fapcconnect.com.

FAPC, a part of OSU’s Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, helps to discover, develop, and deliver technical and business information that stimulates and supports the growth of value-added food and agricultural products and processing in Oklahoma. 

Story by Mandy Gross

Jefferson County Free Fair was a success thanks to those who volunteered to help make it a success!  Lots of work is needed for County Free Fairs and it is worth it when citizens come up to you and say “this fair is the best I’ve seen in a long time!”  Go ahead, plan and prepare items to enter into next year’s fair!  

This year, 14 Jefferson County 4-H members will have a total of 22 items selected to be entered into the Oklahoma City State Fair held September 13-23.

If you have a chance to go to the State fair, make sure you visit the  Oklahoma Expo Hall and look at all the 4-H exhibits; in the same building will be the FFA exhibits.  Show your support by congratulating these members!

4-H Members having state-bound Indoor exhibits:

Abby Davis, Waurika

Alicen Williams, Ryan

Allie Thomas, Waurika

Caitlyn Ramsey, Waurika

Haley Poage, Ryan

Hannah Williams, Ryan

Heather Poage, Ryan

Kane Rapier, Ringling

Karleigh Ficklin, Ringling

Kaylee Morris, Waurika

Koble Lewis, Ryan

Kylee Charmasson, Ryan

Riley Ross, Ryan

Sarah Tyus, Ryan

Next week I will have the results for these exhibitors’ entries!  

September 1 began the 4-H enrollment year 2018-2019.  Go to ok.4honline.com to update your family profile page.  If you have not been previously enrolled online, you will need to create your family profile page.  If you need assistance, call us at 580-228-2332.  4-H members must be active before they can show in the spring Livestock Show.

Here’s a question about 4-H:  On the 4-H Clover, what do the 4 “H”s represent?

Answer: “They represent the equal training of the head, heart, hands and health of every member”.

There are several reasons why joining 4-H is a good choice; there are events which help development leadership, self-confidence and there are scholarship opportunities.

Contact our OSU Extension office at 580-228-2332 if you have questions!

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