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The Oklahoma Women in Agriculture and Small Business Conference is back for 2021

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With an emphasis for empowering women in rural Oklahoma, the Oklahoma Extension Service, OSU Agriculture Economics Department and partnering sponsors are excited to bring back the Oklahoma Women in Agriculture and Small Business Conference on August 5-6, 2021 in Oklahoma City.

This year’s conference will open with Kelli Payne, the first female President for the Oklahoma National Stockyard and a 5th generation farmer.  She will share her experiences as a female leader in the agriculture industry and share her commitment for economic development and growth in Oklahoma agriculture.  

Oklahoma Farm Bureau is sponsoring Michele Payn, Connecting Gate to Plate with her dynamic luncheon keynote presentation “Take Food Bullying By The Horns” along with a signed copy of Michele’s book by the same title.  During this thought-provoking program, Michele will bring many, in-person or online examples of marketing tactics for food bullying. Payn illustrates how trends in neuroscience and psychology are changing perceptions about farming, ranching, and agriculture as a whole. She also takes a lively look at where these trends have led to bullying within agriculture and how we can be more compassionate in our business.  

Day two opening keynote Brian Whitacre, OSU Extension Specialist for Rural and Economic Development, will speak about rural broadband internet in the wake of COVID-19 with insight into current and future programs and trends.  

Closing luncheon keynote is Amanda Radke, Beef Magazine “Dynamics of Multi-Generational Family Agricultural Businesses”.  Working alongside family can be a true blessing, but it can also be a curse. By sharing specific examples of success stories and of extreme failures, Radke’s speech is to help farming families stay in business, avoid pitfalls and love each other through good times and bad.

“This conference draws women from all backgrounds and we want to give them insight and tools they can use to improve their operation and wellbeing.,” said Sonya McDaniel, Oklahoma State University Extension Educator and conference coordinator. “The interest for connecting farm to food, communicating with consumers and continuing the legacy of farming families is of great interest across our state.” 

The conference will feature four educational tracks: Agricultural production, alternative enterprises, business and finance, and the beginning farmer.  Attendees can choose what best meets their need and interests from 22 workshops over the two-day conference.   

Visiting a variety of exhibits providing helpful resources designed to enhance attendees’ farming or small business efforts, as well as network with other women in agriculture will round out the conference providing a great mix of education and social interaction.    

“I consider myself a farmer, not a ‘farm woman,’ so for years I didn’t see the need to attend a conference targeted at women. But, after attending these conferences, I realized there is so much value,” said Karen Eifert-Jones, a farmer near Waukomis, Oklahoma, who also is a member of the conference’s organizing committee. “What is unique about the Women in Ag and Small Business Conference is the camaraderie; the drive to build one another up and the excitement that comes from seeing other women succeeding at their business.” 

This long-running annual event was postponed for a few years, but very excited to be back at a new location in Oklahoma City.  The conference will take place at the Champion Conference Center at 803 S. Meridian Ave.  Special room rates are available at the Hilton Garden Inn located directly in front of the conference site.  To reserve a room simply contact the hotel at (405) 942-1400 and tell them you are with the Women in Agriculture Conference. 

Lock in the early bird registration fee of $75 before July 26, 2021. Registration raises to $125 after July 26, no refunds.  Registrations can be made online by visiting the conference website at extension.okstate.edu/events/women-in-ag

“The conference planning committee is very excited to bring back this conference, especially after quarantines and the craziness of the past year”, says McDaniel “We hope to provide a great educational experience, but more importantly a place where women in agriculture can feel empowered and supported.”  

Oklahoma State University, as an equal opportunity employer, complies with all applicable federal and state laws regarding non-discrimination and affirmative action.  Oklahoma State University is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all individuals and does not discriminate based on race, religion, age, sex, color, national origin, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, disability, or veteran status with regard to employment, educational programs and activities, and/or admissions. For more information, visit https:///eeo.okstate.edu

Women in Agriculture and Small Business conference

August 5-6, 2021

Champion Conference Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

The Women in Agriculture conference will follow all CDC and OSU COVID-19 safety protocols in place at the time of the conference.

Registration: $ 75 per person (by July 26, 2021)

                  $ 125 per person (after July 26, 2021)

Registration fee includes two lunches and all breaks

For questions about registration, please contact 405-744-6489 or extension.okstate.edu/events/women-in-ag

Agricultural Conferences Attn: Women in Ag Conference – 430 Student Union, Stillwater, OK  74078

Education | Networking | Resources

The Oklahoma Women in Agriculture and Small Business conference provides risk 

management education in the areas of production, marketing, financial, legal and human risks inherent to women owned operations. Four general sessions and concurrent workshops focus on educational information and resources to mitigate and manage risks through implementation of new methods and tools.

Empowering Women in Rural America.

  Keynote Speakers

The 2021 Women in Agriculture conference speakers are proudly sponsored by the Oklahoma Farm Bureau.

Day One – Michele Payn Cause Matters Corp. Connecting Gate to Plate
Take Food Bullying By the Horns

Each luncheon attendee receives a free copy of Michele’s book

Day Two – Amanda Radke Beef Magazine
Multigenerational Family Agriculture Businesses

Get Involved

The Statewide Women in Agriculture and Small Business Conference is back for 2021 thanks to funds from Reinvesting in Oklahoma State University’s Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, along with an increase in private sponsorships making it possible to resume this amazing educational event. Display booths for products, programs or resources require a $250 sponsorship and include one registration. 

Jeffco COOP News

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Jefferson County 4-H members and Adult or Teen Volunteers Online Enrollment for 2020-2021 is now available. You will update your current 4-H Online Enrollment information- do not create a new profile!  If you are a new member and need assistance, call our office at 580-228-2332 and we will gladly assist you with your online enrollment!  

Jefferson County 4-H Fall Fest is scheduled for Tuesday, October 20 from 5 p.m. – 7 p.m. for enrolled 4-H members and families. Costume contest, games, a fun activity and food!  RSVP at 228-2332 to help us plan for food!  

4-H Teen leadership team– looking for 4-H teens who will become our Teen leadership team!  Contact Tara for more information.

Co-Parenting for Resilience Class for Separating or Divorcing couples with Minor children living in the home is offered monthly.  The next class offered in Jefferson County OSU Extension office will be Tuesday, October 13, 2020.  Registration is required; contact Tara Brown at 580-228-2332 for additional information.

Money Tips:  Dollar Decisions

Ask yourself these questions BEFORE making a purchase:

– Will this purchase meet one of my goals?

– Do I really want and need it?

– Can I afford it?

– What must I give up to have it?

– Am I buying this only because it’s on sale?

– Would I buy this if I had to pay cash?

– If I charge this, can I pay off this month’s bill?

– Would I come back tomorrow to buy this?

Many times, purchases are made “Spontaneous” which means money encourages you to enjoy the moment even if it means stressful times later due to going into debt, having to borrow money from others or spending money you do not have.

Contact Tara Brown for more information on an upcoming class “Check and Balance”.

Jefferson County Free Fair Indoor Results

Adult Open Class

Kitchen Articles

1st Place   Mary Davis, Hastings

Bath Articles

1st Place   Mary Davis, Hastings

Bedroom Articles

a. Crochet Afghan 

1st Place Rebecca Hauser, Waurika

b. Dresser Runner 

1st Place Mary Davis. Hastings

c. Baby Quilt 

1st Place    Mary Davis, Hastings

Clothing

  1. Jewelry Crawl   1st Place    Mary Davis, Hastings
  2. Poncho    1st Place    Mary Davis, Hastings
  3. Doll    1st Place,   Linda Franklin, Waurika
  4. Special Occasion    1st Place    Linda Franklin, Waurika
  5. Adult Fitted Face Mask   1st Place   Levida Dyer, Waurika
  6. Adult Pleated Face Mask.  1st Place   Linda Franklin, Waurika
  7. Child Girl Face Mask    1st Place   Levida Dyer, Waurika
  8. Child Boy Face Mask   1st Place   Levida Dyer, Waurika
  9. Teen Face Mask    1st Place    Linda Franklin, Waurika

Photography

Unframed Color

Nature   1st Place    Judy Henderson, Waurika

                2nd Place   Darren Beaver, Waurika

Land Mark   1st Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

Still Life   1st Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

Nature Plant   1st Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

Weather   1st Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

                   2nd Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

                   3rd Place   Darren Beaver, Waurika

Black & White

Agriculture   1st Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

Framed Color

Nature   1st Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

Land Mark   1st Place   Darren Beaver, Waurika

Still Life   1st Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

Nature Plant   1st Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

                          2nd Place   Shirley Beaver, Waurika

                           3rd Place   Darren Braver, Waurika

                          4th Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

Nature Trees   1st Place   Darren Beaver, Waurika

                           2nd Place   Darren Beaver, Waurika

Weather           1st Place   Darren Beaver, Waurika

                           2nd Place   Darren Beaver, Waurika

                           3rd Place    Judy Henderson, Waurika

                           4th Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

                           5th Place   Darren Beaver, Waurika

Agriculture       1st Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

                           2nd Place   Shirley Beaver, Waurika

Sports               1st Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

Portrait             1st Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

                           2nd Place   Shirley Beaver, Waurika

Animals             1st Place   Shirley Beaver, Waurika

                           2nd Place   Shirley Beaver, Waurika

                           3rd Place    Shirley Beaver, Waurika

Other                 1st Place   Darren Beaver, Waurika

Overall Best Photo         Shirley Beaver. Waurika

Arts/Crafts

Outdoor   1st Place    Pat McGriff, Waurika

 Wall Hanging   1st Place   Lisa Follis, Waurika

                            2nd Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

                            3rd Place   Lisa Follis, Waurika

                            4th Place   Lisa Follis, Waurika

Acrylic Painting   1st Place   Linda Franklin, Waurika

                              2nd Place   Linda Franklin, Waurika

                             3rd Place   Linda Franklin, Waurika

                              4th Place   Chase Wardlow, Waurika

Woodworking   1st Place   Pat McGriff, Waurika

Refinished   1st Place   Rebecca Hauser, Waurika

Repurposed   1st Place   Lisa Follis, Waurika

                         2nd Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

                         3rd Place   Mary Davis, Hastings

                         4th Place   Linda Franklin, Waurika

Jewelry   

Fossilized Collection    1st Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

Agate Necklace   1st Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

                               2nd Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

                               3rd Place,   Judy Henderson, Waurika

Turquoise   1st Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

                     2nd Place    Judy Henderson, Waurika

                     3rd Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

Cabochron Collection   1st Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

Wire Wrap   1st Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

                       2nd Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

Petrified Collection   1st Place   Judy Henderson, Waurika

Holiday

Christmas   1st Place   Mary Davis, Hastings

Easter     1st Place   Linda Franklin, Waurika

   2nd Place   Linda Franklin, Waurika

Fall   1st Place   Pat McGriff, Waurika

Other                  1st Place   Lisa Follis, Waurika

                            2nd Place   Lisa Follis, Waurika

                            3rd Place    Stormy Moss, Waurika

Face Mask

Adult   1st Place   Levida Dyer, Waurika

             2nd Place   Linda Franklin, Waurika

Child   1st Place    Linda Franklin, Waurika

Dolls   1st Place   Mary Davis, Hastings

            2nd Place   Linda Franklin, Waurika

           3rd Place    Linda Franklin, Waurika

Quilts

Hand Stitched   1st Place   Peggy Bates, Ryan

Machine     1st Place   Pat McGriff, Waurika

Crochet    1st Place   Linda Franklin, Waurika

Best Of Show   Peggy Bates, Ryan

Plants

   1st Place   Mary Davis, Hastings

               2nd Place   Pat McGriff, Waurika

Cookies    

1st Place   Mary Davis, Hastings

                  2nd Place   Mary Davis, Hastings

Cake   1st Place   Peggy Bates, Ryan

Pies

Nut   1st Place   Mary Davis, Hastings

Fruit   1st Place   Mary Davis, Hastings

Ice Box Pie   1st Place    Mary Davis, Hastings

Other   1st Place   Ashley Moen, Waurika

Breads

Yeast Rolls   1st Place   Pat McGriff, Waurika

Zucchini Bread   1st Place    Pat McGriff, Waurika

Best Decorated Cookie Jar    Mary Davis, Hastings

Best Pie Maker   Mary Davis, Hastings

Canning

Vegetables   1st Place   Levida Dyer, Waurika

                       2nd Place   Levida Dyer, Waurika

                       3rd Place   Levida Dyer, Waurika

Tomato Sauce   1st Place   Abbie Trip, Ringling

Salsa   1st Place   Abbie Tripp, Ringling

            2nd Place   Levida Dyer, Waurika

            3rd Place   Pat McGriff, Waurika

Pickles   1st Place   Levida Dyer, Waurika

               2nd Place   Levida Dyer, Waurika

Bread & Butter Pickles   1st Place   Abbie Tripp, Ringling

                                            2nd Place   Heather Bryant, Waurika

Pickled Okra   1st Place   Heather Bryant, Waurika

                         2nd Place   Heather Bryant, Waurika

Squash Relish   1st Place   Abbie Tripp, Ringling

                           2nd Place   Marie Jordan, Waurika

Other    1st Place   Heather Bryant, Waurika

              2nd Place   Heather Bryant, Waurika

Jellies/ Jams   1st Place   Abbie Tripp, Ringling

                          2nd Place   Abbie Tripp, Ringling

                           3rd Place   Abbie Tripp, Ringling

                           4th Place   Abbie Tripp, Ringling

                            5th Place   LaRonda Duncan, Waurika

                             6th Place   LaRonda Duncan, Waurika

Vegetables

Basket   1st Place   Mary Davis, Hastings

Okra   1st Place   Clifford Avens, Ryan

             2nd Place   Gayle Austin, Waurika

Pumpkin   1st Place   Mary Davis, Hastings

Watermelon   1st Place   Mary Davis, Hastings

Open Youth

Clothing  1st Place   Heather Poage, Ryan

Outdoor    

Rocks   1st Place   Ace Dyer, Hastings

Woodworking   1st Place   Oat Wyler, Waurika

Geology   1st Place   Ace Dyer, Hastings

Arts/Crafts

Magnetic/Legos   1st Place   Jet Dyer, Hastings

Leather Craft   1st Place   Ace Dyer, Hastings

Woodworking   1st Place   Ace Dyer, Hastings

Acrylic Painting   1st Place   Rylee Townsend, Ryan

                               2nd Place   Destiny Richardson, Waurika

                               3rd Place   Carlie Campiche, Waurika

                               4th Place Rylee Townsend, Ryan

Pencil Art    2nd Place   Destiny Richardson, Waurika

Repurposed   1st Place   Ace Dyer, Hastings

Cookies   1st Place   Landry Forsyth, Waurika

Bread   1st Place   Landry Forsyth, Waurika

Vegetables   1st Place   Alexia Henry, Waurika

 Fruits   1st Place   Jet Dyer, Hastings

Eggs

White   1st Place   Jet Dyer, Hastings

Brown   1st Place   Jet Dyer, Hastings

               2nd Place   Landry Forsyth, Waurika

Other    1st Place   Jet Dyer, Hastings

              2nd Place   Jet Dyer, Hastings

4-H

Poster Art   1st Place   Heather Poage, Ryan

Arts/Crafts   1st Place   Cabot Allen, Ringling

                       2nd Place   Heather Poage, Ryan

 3rd Place   Hannah Williams, Ryan

Metal   1st Place   Tucker Mashore, Ringling

Finger Painting   1st Place   Oat Wyler, Waurika

Outdoor   1st Place   Tucker Mashore, Ringling

Clothing   1st Place    Heather Poage, Ryan

Photography   

Black & White Unframed   1st Place   Oat Wyler, Waurika

Vegetables   

Okra   1st Place   Saylor Smith, Ringling

            2nd Place   Weston Smith, Ringling

Eggs

Brown    1st Place   Jasmine Henry, Waurika

Other    1st Place    Jasmine Henry, Waurika

Canning

Pickled Okra   1st Place   Weston Smith, Ringling

                          2nd Place   Saylor Smith, Ringling

Jellies/Jams

Fruit   1st Place   Jasmine Henry, Waurika

Other   1st Place   Jasmine Henry, Waurika

FFA

Photography   

Nature   1st Place   Houston Scott, Waurika

Agriculture   1st Place   Houston Scott, Waurika

Acrylics    1st Place   Heather Poage, Ryan

Outdoor   1st Place   Alexia Henry, Waurika

Vegetables

Yellow Squash   1st Place   Alexia Henry, Waurika

Zucchini Squash   1st Place   Alexia Henry, Waurika

Tomatoes   1st Place   Alexia Henry, Waurika

Tractor Driving

Jr. Division   Cody Ramsey, Waurika

Pet Contest

1st Place   Bean Wester, Waurika

2nd Place   Boone Wester, Waurika

3rd Place   Ace Dyer, Hastings

4th Place   Jet Dyer, 

2020 Free Fair Livestock Results

Heifer Class

Grand Champion   Clara Cross, Waurika

Reserve Grand Champion   Clara Cross, Waurika

Steer Class

Grand Champion   Rance Howard, Ringling

Reserve Grand Champion   Rance Howard, Ringling

Mini Hereford

Grand Champion   Bean Walker, Waurika

Reserve Champion   Boone Wester, Waurika

Goats

Doe Goat

Grand Champion   Alexia Henry, Waurika

Reserve Champion   Jasmine Henry, Waurika

Wether Goat

Grand Champion   Oat Wyler, Waurika

Horse

Grand Champion   Dallie Taylor, Ringling

Jeffco COOP News

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Jefferson County Free Fair – Thursday, August 27-Saturday, August 29, 2020

Many counties have cancelled their county fair this fall; Oklahoma City State Fair has been cancelled. However! Jefferson County Free Fair has been scheduled for Thursday, August 27 – Saturday, August 29, 2020 with modifications to try to follow CDC Guidelines due to COVID-19 pandemic. Pre-tagged items for Indoor Exhibits will be accepted until 2 p.m. Thursday, August 27 to allow Judging of items; the Exhibits Room will be open Friday, August 28; Livestock show will be Saturday, August 29.   Pet Show and the Tractor Driving Contest will be 6 p.m. Thursday, August 27.   Fair books with modifications are available at Jefferson County OSU Extension Office. 

Co-Parenting for Resilience Class for Separating or Divorcing couples with Minor children living in the home is offered monthly.  The next class offered in Jefferson County OSU Extension office will be Tuesday, August 11, 2020.  Registration is required; contact Tara Brown at 580-228-2332 for additional information.

Oklahoma Home and Community Education – OHCE is in a unique position to help individual members and their families and communities develop a higher level of living through education. No other organization is better poised to develop community leaders and informed citizens through research based educational programs.  Our next meeting will be August 18 with a lesson “Emergency Preparedness”.

There will be modifications for our annual Quilt Turning scheduled for 10 a.m. Saturday, August 29; there will be no brunch served this year.

** Membership is open to any person interested in joining us as we learn research-based information and how to apply it to our daily lives.  Membership for 2021 is now being accepted.  Contact Tara Brown, Jefferson County OSU Extension Educator at 580-228-2332 for additional information.  Officers are: Melicia McFadden, president; Carolyn Watkins, vice president; Deborah Farrar, Treasurer.

Jefferson County 4-H:  Members – get your fair projects completed!  Online Enrollment for 2020-2021 will be available after August 1.  You will update your current 4-H Online Enrollment information- do not create a new profile!  If you are a new member and need assistance, call our office at 580-228-2332 and we will gladly assist you with your online enrollment!  

UNSOLICITED SEEDS FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES have been received in the United States.  If you receive packets of unsolicited seeds, do not plant them.  Call our office (580-228-2332) and we will open the lobby and assist you getting them mailed to the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture for their investigation.  Thank you, Tara Brown, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences/4-H Youth Development, Int. CED

Heat Stroke vs Heat Exhaustion

Heat Stroke is A condition that occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature and can cause death or permanent disability.

Symptoms

• High body temperature

•Confusion

•Loss of coordination

•Hot, dry skin or profuse sweating

•Throbbing headache

•Seizures, coma

First Aid

•Request immediate medical assistance.

•Move the worker to a cool, shaded area.

•Remove excess clothing and apply cool water to their body.

Heat Exhaustion

The body’s response to an excessive loss of water and salt, usually through sweating.

Symptoms

•Rapid heartbeat

•Heavy sweating

•Extreme weakness or fatigue

•Dizziness

•Nausea, vomiting

•Irritability

•Fast, shallow breathing

•Slightly elevated body temperature

First Aid

•Rest in a cool area.

•Drink plenty of water or other cool beverages.

•Take a cool shower, bath, or sponge bath.

Recipe

Banana Cocoa Yogurt Pops

Ingredients

•1 cup low-fat vanilla yogurt

•1 medium banana

•2 teaspoons cocoa powder

•1 ice cube tray (or paper cups)

Directions

1.Mash banana with a fork. 

2.Mix banana and yogurt well. 

3.Stir in cocoa powder. 

4.Divide into 4 small paper cups (or 8 mini muffin cups) and place in popsicle sticks (or cut paper straws).

5.Freeze. 

6.Enjoy as a frozen treat!

Beware of COVID-19 contact tracing scams

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STILLWATER, Okla. – As the novel coronavirus continues to make its way back and forth across the country, scams related to COVID-19 continue to multiply. Fake contact tracing has added to the growing list of ways to take advantage of people.

Oklahoma has been seeing a spike in the number of cases of the virus as businesses begin to open up across the state, said Cindy Clampet, Oklahoma State University Extension assistant resource management specialist.

“One of the provisions of the federal CARES Act allows state health departments to hire what are called ‘contact tracers’ in an attempt to help slow the transmission of the virus,” Clampet said. “We have about 600 contact tracers in Oklahoma.”

A contact tracer will contact the person who has tested positive and ask about recent social contacts at work, travel and special events, as well as interactions with family and roommates. Clampet said the tracer will also gather information regarding the infected person’s health and symptoms, and in return, provide information on how to quarantine, socially distance and test further.

A legitimate tracer will not ask for any information that can be used for identity theft, such as social security numbers, bank account/routing numbers, insurance, credit card numbers, Medicare/Medicaid numbers, the ability to pay for testing/treatment or similar details.

“Unfortunately, as we’ve seen in the past, scammers already are coming out posing as contact tracers,” she said. “Because contact tracers will be around for the foreseeable future, it’s important for the public to know what the contract tracers can and cannot do.”

The first clue is that a real tracer is not allowed to give out information about the identities of other people. 

“If you receive a call and the caller names the person you were exposed to, this is a clear sign the caller isn’t a legitimate contact tracer. These scammers also are using text messaging and email as means of contacting unsuspecting people,” she said. 

A typical scam goes something like this: An online email suggests that someone who came in contact with you has tested positive for COVID-19, so you should self-isolate and get tested. Then the trap beckons: “Click here for more information.”

“Whatever you do, don’t click the link,” Clampet said. “It could download harmful malware onto your device that allows the scammer to access person and financial information that can be used to steal money and your identity.”

Another variation on the scam involves a smartphone app that provides information about the infection rate in the local area. The app promises an alert if you’re close to a person who is a positive carrier of COVID-19.

Jeffco COOP News

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 4-H NEWS

STEMist Camps

Get excited! Oklahoma 4-H Virtual STEM camps start next week and run through the first week of August. STEM camps are a great way for 4-H members and youth age 8-12 to get involved with STEM and have some fun this summer! Camps include livestock science, bioenergy, photography, camping, wearable tech and more. 

REGISTER and COMPLETE some or all of the camps ANY TIME, June 8th – August 14th, 2020!

STEM Camps are open to all youth regardless of 4-H membership. If you are not a 4-H member, consider joining or exploring to learn about the opportunities 4-H offers. To learn more about 4-H or find a 4-H Club in your community, contact Jefferson County OSU Extension at (580) 228-2332.    

Participants that complete the projects, Microsoft form and/or FlipGrid will receive a special prize at the end of each camp.

This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. OIA-1301789.  

Gardening: July 6-10 

Weather: July 6-10  

Camping: July 13-17  

Food Science: July 15-17  

Chemistry: July 20-24  

Farm to Fork: July 20-24  

Science Fair Workshop (Available July 20th, Due July 31st)  

COVID Camp: July 27-31 – If you or a loved one has been affected by the 2020 coronavirus pandemic; this is a camp for you. From sewing, problem solving or making your own hand sanitizer, campers will learn self-sufficiency skills

Wearable Tech: July 28-31 

Wind Power: August 3-7  

4-H Family Tailgating Contest

Just a quick reminder the 4-H Family Tailgating Contest is on the State 4-H Website. The link to the contest information page http://4h.okstate.edu/4-h-tailgate-contest

The registration link is at the bottom of the page. The deadline for the submission of the PowerPoint is July 15, 2020.

Co-Parenting for Resilience Class for Separating or Divorcing couples with Minor children living in the home is offered monthly.  The next class offered in Jefferson County OSU Extension office will be Tuesday, July 7, 2020.  Registration is required; contact Tara Brown at 580-228-2332 for additional information.

Oklahoma Home and Community Education – OHCE is in a unique position to help individual members and their families and communities develop a higher level of living through education. No other organization is better poised to develop community leaders and informed citizens through research based educational programs.

** Membership is open to any person interested in joining us as we learn research-based information and how to apply it to our daily lives.  Contact Tara Brown, Jefferson County OSU Extension Educator at 580-228-2332 for additional information.

July’s lesson, a handmade craft, was provided by Pat McGriff. It was recorded live and is available on Jefferson County OSU Extension’s Facebook page.  

Jeffco Coop News June 18 2020

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West District 4-H South region will hold a Creative Culinary Contest – Fruit and Vegetable Sculpture on Wednesday, June 24 via ZOOM. Registration is due by Friday, June 19.  Youth can register by filling out the Microsoft form online (contact Tara Brown for the link).  Rules will be sent to eligible 4-H members in our June-July 4-H newsletter.

4-H State Roundup 2020 will be held virtually during the month of July and is open to 4-H members who have completed the 7th grade. Registration is now available online – contact Tara Brown for the registration links.  Registration is due June 26, 2020.

Want a short educational video to learn various lessons? Watch short educational videos from Oklahoma 4-H Virtual Clovers Facebook page!

*Information for West District – South region contests, and the State 4-H Roundup are sent through your email used for your 4-H enrollment Online.  Watch for these emails which provide information for your participation in the various contests and state events.

Co-Parenting for Resilience Class for Separating or Divorcing couples with Minor children living in the home is offered monthly.  The next class offered in Jefferson County OSU Extension office will be Tuesday, July 7, 2020.  Registration is required; contact Tara Brown at 580-228-2332 for additional information.

Jefferson County OSU Extension office continues to be open for soil samples, forage samples and water tests drop-offs and is open by appointments.  We continue to strive to serve you in a safe manner and will follow CDC and OSU COVID-19 pandemic safety guidelines.  Call our office for an appointment or if you have any questions.  

Thank you for your understanding, cooperation and support!

Oklahoma State University, as an equal opportunity employer, complies with all applicable federal and state laws regarding non-discrimination and affirmative action.  Oklahoma State University is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all individuals and does not discriminate based on race, religion, age, sex, color, national origin, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, disability, or veteran status with regard to employment, educational programs and activities, and/or admissions.  For more information, visit https:///eeo.okstate.edu.

COVID-19 Current common scams

• A call or e-mail claiming: “I can get you your stimulus check faster…” Or “I have your stimulus check and need a transfer fee or a processing fee…” Or “I need you to verify your bank account number so I can deposit your stimulus check.”

•A call from “Medicare” (not really Medicare) or another vendor offering: COVID testing, medication, vaccination, but “we need your Medicare number to set this up.”

Requests from charities. They may not be legit.   •Work from home or debt consolidation offers.

• A “duct cleaning” company offering to clean your home of viruses.

Never give your Social Security, and other personal information over the telephone unless you made the initial contact and you are certain your contact is legitimate.  

Unemployment scams

• More than one person I have heard of has received a letter from the Oklahoma Employment Securities Commission telling them that they have applied for unemployment using a new address. This is clearly a scam intended to claim unemployment in another person’s name.

•Report this immediately to the OESC.

•www.oesc.ok.gov or fraud@oesc.state.ok.us or call 405-557-7164.

Recipe

CHICKEN TENDERS WITH SALSA

Ingredients

1 1/4 cup low-sodium chicken broth

1 box roasted garlic-and-olive oil couscous

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

6 chicken tenders

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

3/4 teaspoon black pepper, ground

3 medium bell peppers, sliced

1/2 medium sweet onion

2 cloves garlic

salsa, desired amount

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Bring broth to a boil in a 12-inch skillet. Pour over couscous in a medium bowl; cover and set aside.

2. Heat oil in skillet over medium-high heat until very hot. Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper. Place chicken in skillet, skin sides down, and cook 10 minutes or until skin is browned and crispy. Turn chicken over and cook 4 minutes. Transfer chicken to a plate; discard drippings.

3. Sauté peppers and next 2 ingredients for 3 minutes. Arrange chicken on top of peppers, skin sides up. Bake at 425 degrees F for 10 minutes or until done.

4. Fluff couscous with a fork. Serve chicken and peppers on couscous, and top with desired amount of salsa.

Jeffco Coop News June 11 2018

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Phase 3 COVID-19 Reopening Guidelines

•Until further notice, our office is open by appointment only

•Visitors are required to wear face masks at all times while in the office

•Please notify us of your arrival (580/228-2332) and someone will open the door for you.

•If you can answer “Yes” to any of the following, we ask that you notify us and reschedule:

  • Do you feel unwell?
  • Do you have a fever?
  • Do you have a cough?

Have you been exposed to anyone with COVID-19 or the Flu?

Thank you for your patience and understanding as we strive to serve your needs during this pandemic.

4-H News:  Due to the COVID-19, “face to face” 4-H summer camps, contests, events including State 4-H Round-up have been cancelled; HOWEVER – many will be offered virtually (ZOOM). We are excited to announce the next West District South District Culinary Creation Virtual Contest – Fruit and Vegetable Carving Contest via ZOOM on Wednesday, June 24, 2020 starting at 10am.  This will be an individual contest patterned after the state fair contest and available to all 3 age groups.  Registration is due by Friday, June 19 and participants must be bone fide 4-H members. Contact Tara Brown for the link to register.  Our first virtual contest was Table Setting via ZOOM and it was very successful!  We expect this contest to also be successful and encourage all 4-H members to participate.

4-H Stem Camps and State 4-H Roundup will also be held virtually. Get excited! Oklahoma 4-H Virtual STEM camps start next week and run through the first week of August. STEM camps are a great way for 4-H members age 8-12 to get involved with STEM and have some fun this summer! Camps include livestock science, bio energy, photography, camping, wearable tech and more. Register today at the link below! 

http://4h.okstate.edu

These camps are short and video based and will be fun educational opportunities.

  Contact Tara Brown for the links for registration for State 4-H Round-up.

Co-Parenting for Resilience classes will resume with limited class size until Oklahoma has completed Phase 3 of Re-Opening our state.  Contact Tara Brown for the next scheduled class.

Basic Budgeting 

by Cindy Clampet, Assistant State Specialist, Family Resource Management 

There are lots of reasons you may resist creating a monthly budget. Maybe you strongly object to tracking how you spend your money. Or maybe you think having irregular income or expenses keeps you from establishing a budget. 

On the other hand, there is a relief in knowing where your money goes every month, not to mention a budget gives you the flexibility to control where and when you spend or conserve money. 

Additionally, a budget provides a map of your spending so you are not confused about where all your money went at the end of the month, and it allows you to pay your debts and monthly bills while saving some for emergencies and future big purchases. 

To create a basic budget, start by figuring out how much money you have currently as well as how much you have coming in and going out every month. 

List your expenses first. Develop two lists of expenses, one for essentials such as rent or mortgage, the car payment and utilities, and one for flexible expenses like gifts, clothing and eating out. Keeping the essentials and the flexible expenses separate will help you more clearly see where to make cuts, if needed.

Estimate what you spend. Go through your checkbook register and look at receipts from the past few months to see what you actually spent on each category. After compiling all your essential and flexible expenses, total each list. 

Now list your income, including salaries, tips, child support or alimony and any other money coming into the household. Subtract the essential expenses total from the income total. If there is money left over, subtract the flexible expenses total from the remaining amount. 

If you still have funds available, consider starting a savings account or an investing plan. If there is no money left over, or you went into the negative numbers, try to reduce your flexible expenses.

What if there is nothing to cut? Then, it is time to start thinking of ways to increase your income. A part-time job on the weekend, babysitting, cleaning houses, mowing lawns, delivering pizza are all easy ways to boost your income. Or, maybe you have skills that can be traded for money. Do you sew? Doing clothing alterations can earn some pretty good pocket change. Baking, cake decorating, selling crafts, working on cars, handy man jobs, even shopping for others are other examples of potential strategies for earning some extra money. 

Having a budget on paper will not solve all your money problems, but it will give you a good picture of your spending and that will help you form a plan so those dollars go exactly where you want and need them to go.

For more information on setting up a basic budget, contact your local county Extension office – Tara Brown, (580) 228-2332.

Recipe

Cookie Dough Dip

Ingredients

8 oz. cream cheese

½ cup butter, softened

1 cup powdered sugar

2 Tbsp. brown sugar

1 ½ tsp vanilla

1 cup chocolate chips

1 cup toffee bits

Cream the cream cheese and butter; add rest of the ingredients.  Serve with Graham crackers or Apple wedges

OSU Extension News

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 Caregiving during the coronavirus pandemic

Within the last several weeks, Oklahoma, along with the rest of the United States and the world, entered an unprecedented time. As COVID-19 continues to spread, public officials have implemented new policies regarding social spaces, increasing to shelter-in-place orders across the state.

Kris Struckmeyer, Oklahoma State University Extension assistant specialist, said many families are left to figure out how to both work from home, as well as help continue their children’s educations.

“But for some families, it isn’t about trying to figure out ‘new’ math or brushing off their geography skills, but instead, how to best care for an aging relative,” Struckmeyer said.

Coronavirus disease 2019, also known as COVID-19, is a respiratory illness that can be transmitted by close contact with an infected person through droplets produced when they cough or sneeze. Another way the disease can be transmitted is coming in contact with a surface or object that has the droplets on it, then touching their mouth, nose or eyes. Some symptoms include fever, cough and shortness of breath. While some patients have reported mild cases, individuals with weakened immune systems, such as older adults or those with asthma, are at an increased risk for severe – even deadly – respiratory symptoms. 

“So, what can caregivers do to protect themselves and their loved ones? First and foremost, it is vital as the caregiver to keep yourself well,” he said. “Wash your hands frequently for at least 20 seconds with soap and warm water. Caregivers also should avoid crowds. This has become a little easier as people are sheltering at home.”

Other tips include coughing or sneezing into the bend of your elbow or a disposable tissue and cleaning frequently touched surfaces in your home. This includes mobility and medical equipment.

Not only do caregivers need to keep themselves well, they also need to keep their loved one well, too.

“To help reduce the risk of exposure, take your loved one to the emergency room only if they’re having difficulty breathing or a very high fever,” Struckmeyer said. “Otherwise, your best bet is to call your healthcare provider. Check into telehealth options. Medicare has expanded the benefits for telehealth.”

He also suggests helping your loved one remember to wash their hands. Caregivers could even put written notes around the house with reminders. For those fortunate enough to have hand sanitizer in the home, keep it out in the open so it serves as a visual reminder to use it. Also, have an alternate plan in mind in the event that you as the primary caregiver becomes ill.

“In these times, it’s important to remember that social distancing doesn’t isolation. Encourage your loved one to think beyond their circle of friends and reach out to neighbors or congregation members,” he said. “Thankfully during this time, technology can help with social distancing while still feeling in touch. Show your loved one how to video chat with a loved one or make the call yourself and hand off the phone.” 

While technology is a wonderful tool to use, going old-school can be just as much fun. Struckmeyer said. Ask other family members and friends to write letters or cards to help lift your love one’s spirits.

“Above all, always ensure your loved one feels included. As we are all homebound during this unprecedented time, it may be a good idea to ask your loved one to complete a project,” he said. “Be sure that the project is something that excites them and keeps them engaged, though it does not need to be a large project. This also is a great time to get your loved one to tell stories of their youth. Record short videos or audio tapes to capture these precious memories.”

Co-Parenting for Resilience – class for parents of minor children and are going through a Divorce or Separation:  during the COVID-19 pandemic, no face to face classes will be held at Jefferson County OSU Extension.  Online classes are available for a Course Fee of $55 and are accessible at https://huymansciences.okstate.edu/fcs/coparenting/online-registration.html

Contact your county judge prior to registering to see if online classes are acceptable for him/her.  Face to Face classes will resume when it is determined safe to do so by Center of Disease Control and by State Guidelines.

Oklahoma State University, as an equal opportunity employer, complies with all applicable federal and state laws regarding non-discrimination and affirmative action.  Oklahoma State University is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all individuals and does not discriminate based on race, religion, age, sex, color, national origin, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, disability, or veteran status with regard to employment, educational programs and activities, and/or admissions.  For more information, visit https:///eeo.okstate.edu.

Hand Sanitizers

Hand sanitizers are a hot item these days, usually unavailable in stores. So some consumers have found “recipes” for making them at home. However, FDA recommends that hand sanitizers should not be made at home. If made incorrectly, hand sanitizers can be too weak and be ineffective, and there have been reports of skin burns from homemade hand sanitizers that are too strong. Click on the attached link to learn more and help answer consumer questions about hand sanitizers. 

https://www.fda.gov/drugs/information-drug-class/qa-consumers-hand-sanitizers-and-covid-19

Barbara Brown

Food Specialist, Associate Professor

Department of Nutritional Sciences

Oklahoma State University

301 Human Sciences

Stillwater, OK  74078-6141

P: 405.744.6940

Oklahoma Home and Community Education (OHCE)

When the call came reporting Homemade Fabric face masks were needed by healthcare professionals to help protect them during the COVID-19 pandemic, several Oklahoma Home and Community Education groups began using their sewing skills and created over 20,000 masks (and still counting) which were donated to various hospitals and clinics.  There were some 4-H members who also made masks, but it is unknown at this time how many were made by the 4-H groups.  If you would like to become a member of one or both of these groups in Jefferson County, contact Tara Brown, Jefferson County OSU Extension Family & Consumer Sciences/4-H Youth Development.

Recipe

Easy Apple Turnovers

A cross between a cake, cookie and a bowl of oatmeal, this make-ahead treat is handy to heat up and have for a quick healthy breakfast or snack. You can add a touch more brown sugar if you like it sweeter and a splash of milk for more creaminess.

INGREDIENTS:

• 1 6-inch circle or circle-like piece of pie crust or puff pastry – you can use scraps that you’ve re-rolled together, this isn’t a fussy dessert

• 1/2 small or 1/4 large peeled and cored apple

• About 2 tsp. brown sugar

• About 1 tsp. flour

• Sprinkle of cinnamon

• Thin pat of butter (about 1 tsp.)

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Lay the circle of dough on a baking sheet. Put the apple half or quarter on one side of the circle.

2. Sprinkle the apple with the sugar, flour, and cinnamon. Top with the thin pat of butter.

3. Fold the dough in half, covering the apple piece. Crimp the pastry edges together.

4. Bake until the crust is nicely browned, about 40 minutes.

Makes 1 Easy Apple Turnover

OSU Extension News January 30, 2020

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Healthy Habits to Help Prevent Flu

The single best way to prevent seasonal flu is to get vaccinated each year, but good health habits like covering your cough and washing your hands often can help stop the spread of germs and prevent respiratory illnesses like the flu. There also are flu antiviral drugs that can be used to treat and prevent flu. The tips and resources below will help you learn about steps you can take to protect yourself and others from flu and help stop the spread of germs.

1. The seasonal flu vaccine protects against the influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the upcoming season. There are several flu vaccine options this flu season.

Avoid close contact.

Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.

2. Stay home when you are sick.

If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. This will help prevent spreading your illness to others.

3. Cover your mouth and nose.

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick. Flu and other serious respiratory illnesses, like respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), are spread by cough, sneezing, or unclean hands.

4. Clean your hands.

Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.

• Handwashing: Clean Hands Save Lives

Tips on hand washing and using alcohol-based hand sanitizers

• It’s a SNAP Toolkit: Handwashingexternal icon

Hand washing resources from the It’s A SNAP program, aimed at preventing school absenteeism by promoting clean hands. From the School Network for Absenteeism Prevention, a collaborative project of the CDC, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the American Cleaning Institute.

5. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.

6. Practice other good health habits.

Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school, especially when someone is ill. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.

Co-Parenting for Resilience    Divorce or Separation is not an easy time in a married couple’s life.  Can you imagine what minor children in the home are feeling? 

The Co-Parenting for Resilience program is a four-hour class that is based on current research.  It uses a combination of lecture, discussion, video, activities, and examples to help parents discover effective strategies that promote their children’s healthy adjustment to their parent’s separation. Co-Parenting for Resilience, meets the requirements of Oklahoma law and is based on the latest research on marriage, divorce and children.  Tara Brown will present class at 1 p.m. Tuesday, February 18, 2020; pre-registration is required.  Call Jefferson County OSU Extension Office at 580-228-2332 for registration information.

Oklahoma State University, in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Executive Order 11246 as amended, and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Higher Education Act), the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and other federal and state laws and regulations, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, genetic information, sex, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, disability, or status as a veteran, in any of its policies, practices or procedures.  This provision includes, but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid, and educational services. The Director of Equal Opportunity, 408 Whitehurst, OSU, Stillwater, OK 74078-1035; Phone 405-744-5371; email: eeo@okstate.edu has been designated to handle inquiries regarding non-discrimination policies.  Any person who believes that discriminatory practices have been engaged in based on gender may discuss his or her concerns and file informal or formal complaints of possible violations of Title IX with OSU’s Title IX Coordinator 405-744-9154. Jefferson County Oklahoma Home and Community Education (OHCE)

Jefferson County OHCE met Tuesday, January 21 at the OSU Extension office.  Tara Brown, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences/4-H Youth Development provided the program on “Simple Home Repairs”.  After the program, each member prepared their own Chicken Quesadilla for lunch.  Genevieve Hogstad provided homemade Pecan Pralines for dessert while we had an enjoyable time of fellowship.  Our next meeting will be 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, February 18, 2020 at Jefferson County OSU Extension office located at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds.  Brenda Gandy-Jones, Stephens County OSU Extension Educator will provide a lesson on “Healthy Hearts and Your Health Numbers”.  Our meetings are open to any person interested in fun educational programs.  We invite you to come join us!

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