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Jeffco Coop News June 18 2020

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West District 4-H South region will hold a Creative Culinary Contest – Fruit and Vegetable Sculpture on Wednesday, June 24 via ZOOM. Registration is due by Friday, June 19.  Youth can register by filling out the Microsoft form online (contact Tara Brown for the link).  Rules will be sent to eligible 4-H members in our June-July 4-H newsletter.

4-H State Roundup 2020 will be held virtually during the month of July and is open to 4-H members who have completed the 7th grade. Registration is now available online – contact Tara Brown for the registration links.  Registration is due June 26, 2020.

Want a short educational video to learn various lessons? Watch short educational videos from Oklahoma 4-H Virtual Clovers Facebook page!

*Information for West District – South region contests, and the State 4-H Roundup are sent through your email used for your 4-H enrollment Online.  Watch for these emails which provide information for your participation in the various contests and state events.

Co-Parenting for Resilience Class for Separating or Divorcing couples with Minor children living in the home is offered monthly.  The next class offered in Jefferson County OSU Extension office will be Tuesday, July 7, 2020.  Registration is required; contact Tara Brown at 580-228-2332 for additional information.

Jefferson County OSU Extension office continues to be open for soil samples, forage samples and water tests drop-offs and is open by appointments.  We continue to strive to serve you in a safe manner and will follow CDC and OSU COVID-19 pandemic safety guidelines.  Call our office for an appointment or if you have any questions.  

Thank you for your understanding, cooperation and support!

Oklahoma State University, as an equal opportunity employer, complies with all applicable federal and state laws regarding non-discrimination and affirmative action.  Oklahoma State University is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all individuals and does not discriminate based on race, religion, age, sex, color, national origin, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, disability, or veteran status with regard to employment, educational programs and activities, and/or admissions.  For more information, visit https:///eeo.okstate.edu.

COVID-19 Current common scams

• A call or e-mail claiming: “I can get you your stimulus check faster…” Or “I have your stimulus check and need a transfer fee or a processing fee…” Or “I need you to verify your bank account number so I can deposit your stimulus check.”

•A call from “Medicare” (not really Medicare) or another vendor offering: COVID testing, medication, vaccination, but “we need your Medicare number to set this up.”

Requests from charities. They may not be legit.   •Work from home or debt consolidation offers.

• A “duct cleaning” company offering to clean your home of viruses.

Never give your Social Security, and other personal information over the telephone unless you made the initial contact and you are certain your contact is legitimate.  

Unemployment scams

• More than one person I have heard of has received a letter from the Oklahoma Employment Securities Commission telling them that they have applied for unemployment using a new address. This is clearly a scam intended to claim unemployment in another person’s name.

•Report this immediately to the OESC.

•www.oesc.ok.gov or fraud@oesc.state.ok.us or call 405-557-7164.

Recipe

CHICKEN TENDERS WITH SALSA

Ingredients

1 1/4 cup low-sodium chicken broth

1 box roasted garlic-and-olive oil couscous

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

6 chicken tenders

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

3/4 teaspoon black pepper, ground

3 medium bell peppers, sliced

1/2 medium sweet onion

2 cloves garlic

salsa, desired amount

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Bring broth to a boil in a 12-inch skillet. Pour over couscous in a medium bowl; cover and set aside.

2. Heat oil in skillet over medium-high heat until very hot. Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper. Place chicken in skillet, skin sides down, and cook 10 minutes or until skin is browned and crispy. Turn chicken over and cook 4 minutes. Transfer chicken to a plate; discard drippings.

3. Sauté peppers and next 2 ingredients for 3 minutes. Arrange chicken on top of peppers, skin sides up. Bake at 425 degrees F for 10 minutes or until done.

4. Fluff couscous with a fork. Serve chicken and peppers on couscous, and top with desired amount of salsa.

Jeffco Coop News June 11 2018

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Phase 3 COVID-19 Reopening Guidelines

•Until further notice, our office is open by appointment only

•Visitors are required to wear face masks at all times while in the office

•Please notify us of your arrival (580/228-2332) and someone will open the door for you.

•If you can answer “Yes” to any of the following, we ask that you notify us and reschedule:

  • Do you feel unwell?
  • Do you have a fever?
  • Do you have a cough?

Have you been exposed to anyone with COVID-19 or the Flu?

Thank you for your patience and understanding as we strive to serve your needs during this pandemic.

4-H News:  Due to the COVID-19, “face to face” 4-H summer camps, contests, events including State 4-H Round-up have been cancelled; HOWEVER – many will be offered virtually (ZOOM). We are excited to announce the next West District South District Culinary Creation Virtual Contest – Fruit and Vegetable Carving Contest via ZOOM on Wednesday, June 24, 2020 starting at 10am.  This will be an individual contest patterned after the state fair contest and available to all 3 age groups.  Registration is due by Friday, June 19 and participants must be bone fide 4-H members. Contact Tara Brown for the link to register.  Our first virtual contest was Table Setting via ZOOM and it was very successful!  We expect this contest to also be successful and encourage all 4-H members to participate.

4-H Stem Camps and State 4-H Roundup will also be held virtually. Get excited! Oklahoma 4-H Virtual STEM camps start next week and run through the first week of August. STEM camps are a great way for 4-H members age 8-12 to get involved with STEM and have some fun this summer! Camps include livestock science, bio energy, photography, camping, wearable tech and more. Register today at the link below! 

http://4h.okstate.edu

These camps are short and video based and will be fun educational opportunities.

  Contact Tara Brown for the links for registration for State 4-H Round-up.

Co-Parenting for Resilience classes will resume with limited class size until Oklahoma has completed Phase 3 of Re-Opening our state.  Contact Tara Brown for the next scheduled class.

Basic Budgeting 

by Cindy Clampet, Assistant State Specialist, Family Resource Management 

There are lots of reasons you may resist creating a monthly budget. Maybe you strongly object to tracking how you spend your money. Or maybe you think having irregular income or expenses keeps you from establishing a budget. 

On the other hand, there is a relief in knowing where your money goes every month, not to mention a budget gives you the flexibility to control where and when you spend or conserve money. 

Additionally, a budget provides a map of your spending so you are not confused about where all your money went at the end of the month, and it allows you to pay your debts and monthly bills while saving some for emergencies and future big purchases. 

To create a basic budget, start by figuring out how much money you have currently as well as how much you have coming in and going out every month. 

List your expenses first. Develop two lists of expenses, one for essentials such as rent or mortgage, the car payment and utilities, and one for flexible expenses like gifts, clothing and eating out. Keeping the essentials and the flexible expenses separate will help you more clearly see where to make cuts, if needed.

Estimate what you spend. Go through your checkbook register and look at receipts from the past few months to see what you actually spent on each category. After compiling all your essential and flexible expenses, total each list. 

Now list your income, including salaries, tips, child support or alimony and any other money coming into the household. Subtract the essential expenses total from the income total. If there is money left over, subtract the flexible expenses total from the remaining amount. 

If you still have funds available, consider starting a savings account or an investing plan. If there is no money left over, or you went into the negative numbers, try to reduce your flexible expenses.

What if there is nothing to cut? Then, it is time to start thinking of ways to increase your income. A part-time job on the weekend, babysitting, cleaning houses, mowing lawns, delivering pizza are all easy ways to boost your income. Or, maybe you have skills that can be traded for money. Do you sew? Doing clothing alterations can earn some pretty good pocket change. Baking, cake decorating, selling crafts, working on cars, handy man jobs, even shopping for others are other examples of potential strategies for earning some extra money. 

Having a budget on paper will not solve all your money problems, but it will give you a good picture of your spending and that will help you form a plan so those dollars go exactly where you want and need them to go.

For more information on setting up a basic budget, contact your local county Extension office – Tara Brown, (580) 228-2332.

Recipe

Cookie Dough Dip

Ingredients

8 oz. cream cheese

½ cup butter, softened

1 cup powdered sugar

2 Tbsp. brown sugar

1 ½ tsp vanilla

1 cup chocolate chips

1 cup toffee bits

Cream the cream cheese and butter; add rest of the ingredients.  Serve with Graham crackers or Apple wedges

OSU Extension News

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 Caregiving during the coronavirus pandemic

Within the last several weeks, Oklahoma, along with the rest of the United States and the world, entered an unprecedented time. As COVID-19 continues to spread, public officials have implemented new policies regarding social spaces, increasing to shelter-in-place orders across the state.

Kris Struckmeyer, Oklahoma State University Extension assistant specialist, said many families are left to figure out how to both work from home, as well as help continue their children’s educations.

“But for some families, it isn’t about trying to figure out ‘new’ math or brushing off their geography skills, but instead, how to best care for an aging relative,” Struckmeyer said.

Coronavirus disease 2019, also known as COVID-19, is a respiratory illness that can be transmitted by close contact with an infected person through droplets produced when they cough or sneeze. Another way the disease can be transmitted is coming in contact with a surface or object that has the droplets on it, then touching their mouth, nose or eyes. Some symptoms include fever, cough and shortness of breath. While some patients have reported mild cases, individuals with weakened immune systems, such as older adults or those with asthma, are at an increased risk for severe – even deadly – respiratory symptoms. 

“So, what can caregivers do to protect themselves and their loved ones? First and foremost, it is vital as the caregiver to keep yourself well,” he said. “Wash your hands frequently for at least 20 seconds with soap and warm water. Caregivers also should avoid crowds. This has become a little easier as people are sheltering at home.”

Other tips include coughing or sneezing into the bend of your elbow or a disposable tissue and cleaning frequently touched surfaces in your home. This includes mobility and medical equipment.

Not only do caregivers need to keep themselves well, they also need to keep their loved one well, too.

“To help reduce the risk of exposure, take your loved one to the emergency room only if they’re having difficulty breathing or a very high fever,” Struckmeyer said. “Otherwise, your best bet is to call your healthcare provider. Check into telehealth options. Medicare has expanded the benefits for telehealth.”

He also suggests helping your loved one remember to wash their hands. Caregivers could even put written notes around the house with reminders. For those fortunate enough to have hand sanitizer in the home, keep it out in the open so it serves as a visual reminder to use it. Also, have an alternate plan in mind in the event that you as the primary caregiver becomes ill.

“In these times, it’s important to remember that social distancing doesn’t isolation. Encourage your loved one to think beyond their circle of friends and reach out to neighbors or congregation members,” he said. “Thankfully during this time, technology can help with social distancing while still feeling in touch. Show your loved one how to video chat with a loved one or make the call yourself and hand off the phone.” 

While technology is a wonderful tool to use, going old-school can be just as much fun. Struckmeyer said. Ask other family members and friends to write letters or cards to help lift your love one’s spirits.

“Above all, always ensure your loved one feels included. As we are all homebound during this unprecedented time, it may be a good idea to ask your loved one to complete a project,” he said. “Be sure that the project is something that excites them and keeps them engaged, though it does not need to be a large project. This also is a great time to get your loved one to tell stories of their youth. Record short videos or audio tapes to capture these precious memories.”

Co-Parenting for Resilience – class for parents of minor children and are going through a Divorce or Separation:  during the COVID-19 pandemic, no face to face classes will be held at Jefferson County OSU Extension.  Online classes are available for a Course Fee of $55 and are accessible at https://huymansciences.okstate.edu/fcs/coparenting/online-registration.html

Contact your county judge prior to registering to see if online classes are acceptable for him/her.  Face to Face classes will resume when it is determined safe to do so by Center of Disease Control and by State Guidelines.

Oklahoma State University, as an equal opportunity employer, complies with all applicable federal and state laws regarding non-discrimination and affirmative action.  Oklahoma State University is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all individuals and does not discriminate based on race, religion, age, sex, color, national origin, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, disability, or veteran status with regard to employment, educational programs and activities, and/or admissions.  For more information, visit https:///eeo.okstate.edu.

Hand Sanitizers

Hand sanitizers are a hot item these days, usually unavailable in stores. So some consumers have found “recipes” for making them at home. However, FDA recommends that hand sanitizers should not be made at home. If made incorrectly, hand sanitizers can be too weak and be ineffective, and there have been reports of skin burns from homemade hand sanitizers that are too strong. Click on the attached link to learn more and help answer consumer questions about hand sanitizers. 

https://www.fda.gov/drugs/information-drug-class/qa-consumers-hand-sanitizers-and-covid-19

Barbara Brown

Food Specialist, Associate Professor

Department of Nutritional Sciences

Oklahoma State University

301 Human Sciences

Stillwater, OK  74078-6141

P: 405.744.6940

Oklahoma Home and Community Education (OHCE)

When the call came reporting Homemade Fabric face masks were needed by healthcare professionals to help protect them during the COVID-19 pandemic, several Oklahoma Home and Community Education groups began using their sewing skills and created over 20,000 masks (and still counting) which were donated to various hospitals and clinics.  There were some 4-H members who also made masks, but it is unknown at this time how many were made by the 4-H groups.  If you would like to become a member of one or both of these groups in Jefferson County, contact Tara Brown, Jefferson County OSU Extension Family & Consumer Sciences/4-H Youth Development.

Recipe

Easy Apple Turnovers

A cross between a cake, cookie and a bowl of oatmeal, this make-ahead treat is handy to heat up and have for a quick healthy breakfast or snack. You can add a touch more brown sugar if you like it sweeter and a splash of milk for more creaminess.

INGREDIENTS:

• 1 6-inch circle or circle-like piece of pie crust or puff pastry – you can use scraps that you’ve re-rolled together, this isn’t a fussy dessert

• 1/2 small or 1/4 large peeled and cored apple

• About 2 tsp. brown sugar

• About 1 tsp. flour

• Sprinkle of cinnamon

• Thin pat of butter (about 1 tsp.)

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Lay the circle of dough on a baking sheet. Put the apple half or quarter on one side of the circle.

2. Sprinkle the apple with the sugar, flour, and cinnamon. Top with the thin pat of butter.

3. Fold the dough in half, covering the apple piece. Crimp the pastry edges together.

4. Bake until the crust is nicely browned, about 40 minutes.

Makes 1 Easy Apple Turnover

OSU Extension News January 30, 2020

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Healthy Habits to Help Prevent Flu

The single best way to prevent seasonal flu is to get vaccinated each year, but good health habits like covering your cough and washing your hands often can help stop the spread of germs and prevent respiratory illnesses like the flu. There also are flu antiviral drugs that can be used to treat and prevent flu. The tips and resources below will help you learn about steps you can take to protect yourself and others from flu and help stop the spread of germs.

1. The seasonal flu vaccine protects against the influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the upcoming season. There are several flu vaccine options this flu season.

Avoid close contact.

Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.

2. Stay home when you are sick.

If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. This will help prevent spreading your illness to others.

3. Cover your mouth and nose.

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick. Flu and other serious respiratory illnesses, like respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), are spread by cough, sneezing, or unclean hands.

4. Clean your hands.

Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.

• Handwashing: Clean Hands Save Lives

Tips on hand washing and using alcohol-based hand sanitizers

• It’s a SNAP Toolkit: Handwashingexternal icon

Hand washing resources from the It’s A SNAP program, aimed at preventing school absenteeism by promoting clean hands. From the School Network for Absenteeism Prevention, a collaborative project of the CDC, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the American Cleaning Institute.

5. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.

6. Practice other good health habits.

Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school, especially when someone is ill. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.

Co-Parenting for Resilience    Divorce or Separation is not an easy time in a married couple’s life.  Can you imagine what minor children in the home are feeling? 

The Co-Parenting for Resilience program is a four-hour class that is based on current research.  It uses a combination of lecture, discussion, video, activities, and examples to help parents discover effective strategies that promote their children’s healthy adjustment to their parent’s separation. Co-Parenting for Resilience, meets the requirements of Oklahoma law and is based on the latest research on marriage, divorce and children.  Tara Brown will present class at 1 p.m. Tuesday, February 18, 2020; pre-registration is required.  Call Jefferson County OSU Extension Office at 580-228-2332 for registration information.

Oklahoma State University, in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Executive Order 11246 as amended, and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Higher Education Act), the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and other federal and state laws and regulations, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, genetic information, sex, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, disability, or status as a veteran, in any of its policies, practices or procedures.  This provision includes, but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid, and educational services. The Director of Equal Opportunity, 408 Whitehurst, OSU, Stillwater, OK 74078-1035; Phone 405-744-5371; email: eeo@okstate.edu has been designated to handle inquiries regarding non-discrimination policies.  Any person who believes that discriminatory practices have been engaged in based on gender may discuss his or her concerns and file informal or formal complaints of possible violations of Title IX with OSU’s Title IX Coordinator 405-744-9154. Jefferson County Oklahoma Home and Community Education (OHCE)

Jefferson County OHCE met Tuesday, January 21 at the OSU Extension office.  Tara Brown, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences/4-H Youth Development provided the program on “Simple Home Repairs”.  After the program, each member prepared their own Chicken Quesadilla for lunch.  Genevieve Hogstad provided homemade Pecan Pralines for dessert while we had an enjoyable time of fellowship.  Our next meeting will be 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, February 18, 2020 at Jefferson County OSU Extension office located at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds.  Brenda Gandy-Jones, Stephens County OSU Extension Educator will provide a lesson on “Healthy Hearts and Your Health Numbers”.  Our meetings are open to any person interested in fun educational programs.  We invite you to come join us!

Jefferson County 4H Nov 7 2019

Clover Trivia:  What is the 4-H slogan?

Answer:  Learning by doing

Jefferson County 4-H enjoys Fall Fest members, siblings and parents enjoyed Jefferson County 4-H Fall Fest Monday, October 28 at the Jefferson County Fair Building.  Homemade chili, BBQ meatballs and sausages, chips and dip, fresh fruit were available to eat while playing games.  Making smoothies using a 4-H Blender Bike was a big hit! Un-iced cupcakes were available to ice and decorate – several got pretty creative!  

Upcoming Jefferson County 4-H Events:

• Cupcake Wars:  11 a.m. Saturday, November 9 at Jefferson County OSU Extension office.  Contact Tara Brown for details.

• 4-H Kids Cooking in the Kitchen: 4:30 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.  Tuesday, November 26 at Jefferson County OSU Extension office.

• Jefferson County 4-H Teen Leaders: 6 p.m. Tuesday, November 26 also at Jefferson County OSU Extension office.

• Jefferson County Communications Contest: 1 p.m. Saturday, December 18 at Jefferson County OSU Extension Office.

4-H Enrollment is open to youth ages 8 and in the 3rd grade and older; youth between the ages of 5 and 7 may enter as Clover buds.  Enrollment is completed on-line at ok.4honline.com

Call OSU Extension (580-228-2332) if you are interested and need assistance enrolling.

OSU Extension News Nov 7 2019

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Why is it important to eat vegetables?

Eating vegetables provides health benefits – people who eat more vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet are likely to have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Vegetables provide nutrients vital for health and maintenance of your body.

Nutrients

• Most vegetables are naturally low in fat and calories. None have cholesterol. (Sauces or seasonings may add fat, calories, and/or cholesterol.)

• Vegetables are important sources of many nutrients, including potassium, dietary fiber, folate (folic acid), vitamin A, and vitamin C.

• Diets rich in potassium may help to maintain healthy blood pressure. Vegetable sources of potassium include sweet potatoes, white potatoes, white beans, tomato products (paste, sauce, and juice), beet greens, soybeans, lima beans, spinach, lentils, and kidney beans.

• Dietary fiber from vegetables, as part of an overall healthy diet, helps reduce blood cholesterol levels and may lower risk of heart disease. Fiber is important for proper bowel function. It helps reduce constipation and diverticulosis. Fiber-containing foods such as vegetables help provide a feeling of fullness with fewer calories.

• Folate (folic acid) helps the body form red blood cells. Women of childbearing age who may become pregnant should consume adequate folate from foods, and in addition 400 mcg of synthetic folic acid from fortified foods or supplements. This reduces the risk of neural tube defects, spina bifida, and anencephaly during fetal development.

• Vitamin A keeps eyes and skin healthy and helps to protect against infections.

• Vitamin C helps heal cuts and wounds and keeps teeth and gums healthy. Vitamin C aids in iron absorption.

 Health benefits

• As part of an overall healthy diet, eating foods such as vegetables that are lower in calories per cup instead of some other higher-calorie food may be useful in helping to lower calorie intake.

• Eating a diet rich in vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet may reduce risk for heart disease, including heart attack and stroke.

• Eating a diet rich in some vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet may protect against certain types of cancers.

• Adding vegetables can help increase intake of fiber and potassium, which are important nutrients that many Americans do not get enough of in their diet.

• Co-Parenting for Resilience Divorce or Separation is not an easy time in a married couple’s life.  Can you imagine what minor children in the home are feeling?  Co-Parenting for Resilience is a class for divorcing or separating parents with minor children living in the home. It is mandatory by law in Oklahoma and is also valuable for Grandparents and other relatives of minor children going through divorce or separation.  My next class is 1 p.m. Tuesday, November 12, 2019; pre-registration is required.  Call Jefferson County OSU Extension Office at 580-228-2332 for registration information

Check out our Facebook pages for informative topic and messagess:  www.facebook.com/JeffersonCounty Fourh and JeffersonCounty Osu Extension

Orange Honeyed Acorn Squash

Ingredients

• 3 acorn squash (small) 

• 2 cup orange juice 

• 1/4 cup honey 

• 2 tablespoon butter or margarine 

• 1/8 nutmeg (1/8 teaspoon, optional) 

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

2. Cut squash in half. Remove seeds and place halves in shallow baking pan.

3. Combine orange juice and honey. Mix well. Put some of the orange juice/honey mixture in each squash cavity.

4. Add 1 Tablespoon of the margarine to each squash half. Sprinkle with nutmeg, if desired.

5. Cover pan with aluminum foil to keep steam in and speed cooking.

6. Bake 30 minutes. Remove foil and continue baking 30 minutes more, or until squash is tender.

Jefferson County 4H October 31 2019

Clover Trivia:  What is Oklahoma Ag in the Classroom?

Answer:  Oklahoma Ag in the Classroom (OAITC) is the popular school enrichment program whose purpose is to help familiarize school children and teachers with the food and fiber industry.   

Ringling 4-H Thursday, October 24, an informative meeting was held for parents interested in enrolling their children in 4-H.  Volunteer leader, Parilyn Hairod, reported that a tentative schedule for meeting will be:   Cloverbuds (ages 5-7) will meet the 1st and 3rd Mondays and 4-H members (ages 8 and in the 3rd grade and older) will meet the 2nd and 4th Mondays.  This will continue until the groups have been better established and ready for upcoming 4-H events.  4-H is a wonderful program to help teach our youth leadership and other responsibilities – it is more than showing livestock.  What are the interests of our youth?  There is a program for their interest 

• Photography, Cooking, Sewing, Arts, Shooting Sports, Recycle/Refurbish, Wildlife, and more!  Look for the 4-H Float at the Ringling Christmas Parade.  Waurika’s Christmas Parade will be Saturday, December 14. Thank you, Parilyn Hairod for becoming a 4-H Adult Volunteer!

Upcoming Jefferson County 4-H Events:

• Cupcake Wars:  11 a.m. Saturday, November 9 at Jefferson County OSU Extension office.  Contact Tara Brown for details.

• 4-H Kids Cooking in the Kitchen: 4:30 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.  Tuesday, November 26 at Jefferson County OSU Extension office.

• Jefferson County 4-H Teen Leaders: 6 p.m. Tuesday, November 26 also at Jefferson County OSU Extension office.

• Jefferson County Communications Contest: 1 p.m. Saturday, December 18 at Jefferson County OSU Extension Office.

Bug Juice: Serves 8 (½ cup servings)

2 cups Plain, Vanilla Low Fat Yogurt

1 cup Strawberries (we used frozen)

1 cup Orange Juice

OSU Extension News

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Healthy Homes

 Everyone needs a healthy home. However, did you know that some of the most serious health and safety problems may start at home? Did you know that your chances of getting hurt at home are much higher than they are at work or school? Very young children and older adults are the people most likely to get hurt at home. In the U.S., most people spend over 90% of their time indoors. We need to be aware of the health and safety of our indoor environments. There are steps and resources that can help us keep our homes safe. 

Fire Prevention Week (Second week of October) Download the tools to promote home fire safety: http://www.nsc.org/safety_home/SafetyObservances/Pages/FirePreventionWeek.aspx?wa& 

Steps to prevent fires:

• Have properly working smoke alarms 

• Test smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors monthly and change the batteries at least once a year

• Place smoke alarms on each floor of your home and in each bedroom 

• Plan a family escape route and practice it once a month 

• Install a home sprinkler system 

• Place fire extinguishers throughout your home and make sure everyone in the house knows how to use them

As cooler weather comes, please help make certain your homes are Safe by using the following Home-Fire-Safety Checklist. If you use natural gas to fuel your heaters, make certain you have working Carbon Monoxide Detectors and Smoke Detectors.

Co-Parenting for Resilience Divorce or Separation is not an easy time in a married couple’s life.  Can you imagine what minor children in the home are feeling?  Co-Parenting for Resilience is a class for divorcing or separating parents with minor children living in the home. It is mandatory by law in Oklahoma and is also valuable for Grandparents and other relatives of minor children going through divorce or separation.  My next class is 1 p.m. Tuesday, November 12, 2019; pre-registration is required.  Call Jefferson County OSU Extension Office at 580-228-2332 for registration information

Line Dance:   Fridays at 6 p.m. at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds Fair Building.  It is another way to exercise as a group.  Come join us!

Check out our Facebook pages for informative topics:  www.facebook.com/JeffersonCounty Fourh and JeffersonCounty Osu Extension

Pumpkin Chill

• 1 tbsp. olive oil 

• 1 cup yellow onion chopped 

• 1 cup green bell pepper chopped 

• 1/2 cup jalapeno seeded & chopped 

• 1 tbsp. garlic minced 

• 1 lb. extra lean ground beef 

• 1 14.5 oz. can diced tomatoes with the liquid 

• 1 cup water 

• 1 15 oz. can pumpkin puree 

• 1 tbsp. chili powder 

• 1 tsp ground cumin 

• 1 15 oz. can kidney beans rinsed and drained 

Instructions 

1. Heat oil in a large pot over medium high heat. 

2. Add onion, bell pepper, jalapeños and garlic and cook, stirring frequently, until tender. 

3. Add lean beef and cook until browned. 

4. Add tomatoes, pumpkin, water, chili powder, cumin, salt and pepper and bring to a boil. 

5. Reduce heat to medium low and add beans. 

6. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 30 minutes more. Ladle chili into bowls and serve. 

Jefferson County 4H October 17 2019

Clover Trivia:  What entity guides the 4-H Program in the United States?

 Answer: (Cooperative Extension System or Cooperative Extension Service)

Waurika and Ryan Cloverbuds Red River Rangers Club met Monday, October 7 at Ryan Sr. Citizens Center.  Leader Lori Lovett had a fun activity planned and Snacks were served to members and their parents.

The next cloverbud meeting will be 6 p.m. Monday, October 21 here at the Jefferson County Fair building located at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds.  We will make smoothies using a 4-H Blender Bike. Cloverbuds are youth ages 5-7 and enrolled in 4-H.  Come join us!

2 Youth painting
flower pots to plant pansies
during Ringling’s
Western Days

4-H members who are ages 13 and older (or in the 7th grade and older) and actively enrolled in Jefferson County 4-H:  We are excited to include a Teen Leadership Group to our county programs!  Opportunities will be included to assist developing leadership include planning county 4-H fun events, help plan end of the year banquet, assist with county 4-H contests and more!  Contact Tara Brown at 580-228-2332.

Ringling 4-H now has a volunteer Adult leader!  Parilyn Hairod is excited to rejuvenate Ringling 4-H.  She and her husband, Kent, with the assistance of Amanda Ridenour, set up a booth at Ringling Western Days Saturday, October 5.  We had tables set to show a few items Ringling 4-H members had made during the summer as well as information on how to enroll in 4-H.  There were also tables set up for youth and parents to come and paint a flower pot then, after it dried, planted a pansy flower in their flower pot.  57 youth participated and we are excited and hope to regain an active 4-H group in Ringling!  

If you are an adult and interested in volunteering with 4-H, contact Jefferson County OSU Extension office at 580-228-2332.

OSU Extension News October 17 2019

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Managing Money means making choices.  There is never enough money for all the things we want.  What you must do is decide what is most important to you.  For example:  Housing – do you choose to: 

a.  live with family

b. share housing with friends

c. rent place of your own

d. buy home

Whichever your choice, there are other choices you will need to decide such as how much is your monthly income? How much will you be required to pay monthly? how much is housing insurance? How much are utility costs? What type of furnishings will you need?   It begins with a financial plan such as a Budget.  If you are interested in attending a class for additional information, contact Tara Brown, Jefferson County OSU Extension Educator for Family & Consumer Sciences/4-H Youth Development.

Line Dance:   Fridays at 6 p.m. at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds Fair Building.  It is another way to exercise as a group.  Come join us as many of us are still in the “Learning phase”!

Co-Parenting for Resilience Divorce or Separation is not an easy time in a married couple’s life.  Can you imagine what minor children in the home are feeling?  Co-Parenting for Resilience is a class for divorcing or separating parents with minor children living in the home. It is mandatory by law in Oklahoma and is also valuable for Grandparents and other relatives of minor children going through divorce or separation.  My next class is 1 p.m. Tuesday, November 12, 2019; pre-registration is required.  Call Jefferson County OSU Extension Office at 580-228-2332 for registration information

Jefferson County OSU Extension Services office is open 7:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Monday – Friday, excluding holidays recognized by our county offices.  Leland McDaniel, AG/4-H Youth Development and CED, Tara Brown, Family & Consumer Sciences/4-H Youth Development and Linda Whitsett, Administrative Support Specialist are staff members ready to assist you at 580-228-2332.

Check out our Facebook pages for informative topics:  www.facebook.com/JeffersonCounty Fourh and JeffersonCounty Osu Extension

Recipe

Turtle Cake   by Gloria England

1 (1 lb. 2 oz.) box German chocolate cake mix

1 (14 oz.) pkg. caramels

½ cup butter 

1 (5.33 oz.) can evaporated milk

1 cup chopped pecans

1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips

Mix cake according to directions on box. Pour half of batter into prepared 13 x 9-inch pan. Bake 15 minutes.  Melt caramels with butter and milk.  Pour over cake. Sprinkle pecans and chocolate chips over caramel layer.  Cove with rest of batter and bake 15-20 minutes longer.  Temperature:  350°. Times:  15 minutes; 15 to 20 minutes.  Yield:  13 x 9-inch cake pan.

HINT:  Delightful served warm with whipped cream.