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Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Budget Surplus for Next Year?

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 Last session, the Legislature raised taxes on cigarettes, motor fuels and production from new oil and gas wells. This provided enough money to fill a budget hole that loomed for much of the year. It also raised enough to fund an average teacher pay raise of $6,100 – the first raise in a decade – as well as give additional benefits to teachers and funding for textbooks and classroom materials. Money also went to DHS to support in-home care for elderly or disabled adults. Medicaid providers saw reimbursements increased. The Department of Health was able to reinstate funding for child abuse prevention services. Also, money was appropriated to the Department of Corrections to give their employees and guards a very modest pay raise. And, legislators were able to appropriate enough dollars to the Transportation Department to continue its 8-year plan for roads and bridges.

I’m hearing arguments that the state Legislature raised taxes too high last year. I’ve heard some say there will be a billion-dollar budget surplus next year.

I hate to argue, but it’s too early to tell. The taxes the Legislature raised last year have already been spent to fill the $800 million budget hole and provide funding to areas of the budget that needed it. We may, for the first time in several years, have enough to fund core government services instead of cutting services to the vulnerable among us. Enough to keep our teachers in classrooms, fund healthcare, mental health and elder care, put a dent in the disabled services waiting list, sufficiently staff our state public safety agencies, continue the push to fully repair state roads and structurally deficient bridges, and more.

The good news is our economy is trending positive. According to the Office of Management and Enterprise Services (OMES), the past two months’ data shows 2 percent growth above the amount the office estimated for the current fiscal year. This is good news, but we simply do not have enough data to predict a massive surplus at this time.

Let’s assume receipts keep coming in at the same rate as the past two months for the entire year. That would be an overall surplus of 2 percent. The total appropriated state budget was around $6.5 billion last year. A 1 percent change equals around $65 million; 2 percent growth would be a surplus of $130 million – certainly not chump change, but not the excessive billion-dollar amount some are arguing. To reach that amount, receipts would need to come in at more than 15 percent over estimates.

We are moving ahead with the audits of state agencies to find duplication of services and efficiencies. This is good, but the Legislature must make a concerted effort to scrutinize spending across-the-board to stretch our budget and fund what really needs to be funded.

Thankfully, we made a significant dent in our structural budget deficit problem. The policies the Legislature enacted over the past two years have allowed a shift from using one-time, erratic funding sources to more stable recurring sources of revenue. This will help stabilize our budget, but there is still much work to do. We need the economy to hold like it is or get better so we can focus on long-term planning to help us save dollars instead of focusing on filling budget holes. 

Fortunately, we shouldn’t have a budget hole next year, but that doesn’t mean we’ll be flush with cash.  For now, growth is positive based on the two-months of data we have, but much can change and in a short time, in Oklahoma – as we all know.

New Oklahoma Documentary Chronicling Opioid Addiction Epidemic

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OKLAHOMA CITY – Killing Pain, a seven part documentary series chronicling the state’s opioid addiction epidemic launched this week and is available to view, free of charge, on https://www.killingpain.com/.

The in-depth documentary explores the public health crisis in Oklahoma from its origin to steps the state is currently taking to stem the epidemic. The series is presented by Fighting Addiction Through Education (FATE) and produced by Lampstand Media.

The series also features personal stories of addiction, the economic cost of the crisis and the biology of addiction.

Attorney General Mike Hunter appears in multiple episodes to discuss the state’s response and the lawsuit filed by his office last July.

“Killing Pain is a pioneering series that shines light on the tragic story of how our state got in this position and why we are close to ground zero in terms of the addiction epidemic,” Attorney General Hunter said. “I encourage all Oklahomans watch this gripping documentary that covers the many tragic aspects of the crisis and how it impacts all of us. Although the reality of the story is painful, the good news is, Oklahoma is rising to meet this challenge. State officials, business leaders and community organizers are tired of watching our families suffer and are stepping up and doing something about it.

“I appreciate Reggie Whitten and his organization, FATE, for presenting this project and Lampstand for the wonderful care and craftsmanship in which they took in producing it.”

Whitten, who is also a law partner at Whitten – Burrage, founded FATE after the tragic overdose death of his son, Brandon.

“This documentary is part of my ongoing personal mission to show Oklahomans this epidemic is real and it is on our doorstep,” Whitten said. “I also want people to know there is hope and there is help for those who are struggling. No parent should ever have to go through the pain and suffering of losing a child. There is not a day that goes by that I don’t think about Brandon. I want people to know his story and the thousands of other stories that are similar. The more people we can get to understand the realities of the crisis, the more lives of Oklahomans we will save.”

Other prominent Oklahomans interviewed for the series are U.S. Sen. James Lankford, Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater, Commissioner for the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services Terri White and Assistant Clinical Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychiatry, Behavioral Sciences at Oklahoma State University-Center for Health Sciences Dr. Jason Beamon and more.

Founded in 2010, Lampstand tells powerful stories through film to move people to action and change the world around them. Lampstand works with a variety of clients from corporations to nonprofits, long form docs to social campaigns. The company’s work has been featured on Netflix, PBS, National Geographic and with client around the world in over 30 countries and on six continents.

FATE is a nonprofit educational outreach program that seeks to shed a light on the dangers of addiction and substance abuse in Oklahoma. FATE also focuses on motivational efforts to encourage individuals who are suffering from addiction to get help.

From Senator Chris Kidd

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Work is steadily ramping up again as interim studies are getting underway in preparation for the next legislative session.  These are all public meetings and can be watched live on the Senate website.

 I’ve been getting a lot of questions about two issues I’d like to discuss in this column.

1. The audit of the Oklahoma Department of Veteran Affairs

2. Nursing home closures around the state and in our district.

 The VA audit was released at the beginning of August.  The audit revealed there is a serious lack of communication throughout the agency as well as low employee morale.  The communication problem became apparent when constituents were unaware of recent rule changes at the Lawton-Ft. Sill Veterans Center, until the changes had already taken place. It was even more apparent and troubling; I too was unaware of any rule or policy changes until I was informed of these changes by concerned constituents. This proved to me the findings of the audit were accurate. I feel our state agencies should always communicate any policy or rule changes clearly and effectively with the legislature especially when changes are made that have a direct impact on the citizens of our state, moreover, changes that impact those who have served and defended our country, our veterans.  

 Please know that I am working with the ODVA and its administration to address the issues and find solutions concerning our veteran’s centers, especially the Lawton-Ft. Sill Veteran’s Center. Our veterans deserve our respect, honor and only the best care. 

 The second issue I’d like to discuss is Oklahoma’s nursing home industry.  Within the last few months, several of our states long-term care facilities have closed their doors due to a lack of adequate funding. It is critical and of utmost importance that we make a significant investment in our nursing home industry or face many more closures around the state.  Not only will this displace hundreds of residents, but hundreds of working Oklahomans will lose their jobs.  What’s even more concerning is rural Oklahoma will feel the brunt of this problem where jobs are few and places of employment are scarce. 

 For the last several years our state has had to deal with deficient budgets, resulting in a lack of investment that has left the state ranked as one of the worst for nursing care facility funding.  We can and we must do better.

 The AARP recently ranked our state’s nursing homes as some of the worst in the nation based on several factors for quality of care.  The report ranks Oklahoma lowest in the country of nursing care per resident per day nationwide.  In addition, our senior citizen population is growing at an alarming rate.  The number of citizens 85 or older is expected to increase by 38% or 95,000 from 2015.    We must do all we can to prevent the closure of nursing homes and strengthen this industry for future generations.

I’m pleased to say that the Oklahoma Health Care Authority, in collaboration with state and legislative leadership, are giving the first across-the-board reimbursement rate increases since 2009 to long-term care and other SoonerCare (Oklahoma Medicaid) providers.  The increases will go into effect October 1.  Long-term care facility provider rates will be increased by four percent and three percent for other certain contracted provider types or groups.  The three percent will put SoonerCare physician rates at around 89 percent of the Medicare physician fee schedule.  It will also impact most provider types like hospitals and pharmacies. While this is a positive step, it’s my hope we once again increase funding to our long-term care facilities to a level that accurately reflects the true cost of care for nursing home residents during the next legislative session.

 It’s important to note that no new state funds, carryover or one-time funds were used for these increases.  Instead, because of SB 1605, the increases will be funded through program and administrative savings and record drug rebate collections. 

This is a step in the right direction for providing better care to our elderly and disabled.  Like our veterans, they deserve only the highest quality of service.

 At the State Senate, I can be reached by writing to Senator Chris Kidd, State Capitol, 2300 N. Lincoln Blvd. Room 411A, Oklahoma City, OK 73105, emailing me at kidd@oksenate.gov, or by calling (405) 521-5563 and speaking to my assistant Suzanne Earnest.

Senate Pro Tem comments on court’s ruling on SQ 799 referendum petition

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OKLAHOMA CITY – Oklahoma Senate President Pro Tempore Mike Schulz, R-Altus, released the following comment regarding the Oklahoma Supreme Court’s ruling on State Question 799 and referendum petition:

“I am pleased the Oklahoma Supreme Court rejected the effort to repeal HB 1010xx. The Legislature took extraordinary steps in passing HB 1010xx and it is absolutely necessary to fully fund the largest teacher pay raise in state history and the significant increase in education funding passed this session. We should all now turn our focus toward working for the resources and reforms necessary to support our teachers and ensure our children get the best education possible.”

Statement from Senate Democratic Leader on Oklahoma Supreme Court Ruling on State Question 799

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OKLAHOMA CITY- Senate Democratic Leader John Sparks released the following statement on the Oklahoma Supreme Court’s decision to declare Referendum Petition 25, State Question 799 invalid and stricken from the ballot:

 

“Today the Oklahoma Supreme Court ruled that State Question 799, Referendum Petition 25 is invalid. While the Oklahoma Constitution empowers citizens to initiate a referendum petition, it is also very clear what the process and procedures are which must be followed to place the referendum on the ballot. In their rush to begin collecting signatures, the group calling itself ‘Oklahoma Taxpayers Unite!’ and former U.S. Senator Tom Coburn failed to include an accurate gist explaining the purpose of the referendum, and also did not attach an exact copy of the law it seeks to repeal.

 

With the effort to repeal the revenue package by referendum stalled, the focus should now return to enacting long term, sustainable revenue to properly fund education in Oklahoma.”

One Oklahoma child will get $5,529 toward their college savings

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OKLAHOMA CITY (June 4, 2018) – State Treasurer Ken Miller announces the launch of the 2018 Summer Savings Adventure Sweepstakes, which will see one Oklahoma child win $5,529 toward an Oklahoma 529 College Savings Plan account.

Working together with two Oklahoma City Adventure District Partners, Science Museum Oklahoma and the Oklahoma City Zoo, the Summer Savings Adventure encourages families to take time this summer to plan how they will pay for college.

“The first and best advice for anyone looking to pay for a college education is to make a plan,” said Miller, board chair of the Oklahoma 529 Savings Plan (OCSP). “Summer is great time for families to research the resources available to them, like OCSP, look at their budget and start saving for their children’s futures.”

This is the third year OCSP has partnered with the Oklahoma City Zoo and Science Museum Oklahoma for the sweepstakes. Miller said it’s a great fit because each organization is dedicated to a mission of lifetime learning.

“We couldn’t have better partners than the Oklahoma City Zoo and Science Museum Oklahoma,” Miller said. “Generations of families have made lifelong memories and explored the sciences at both of these Oklahoma institutions, and I’m proud that they are helping OCSP to raise awareness about saving for higher education.”

The 2018 Summer Savings Adventure Sweepstakes officially launches today and will close on July 31, 2018. Sweepstakes entry, official rules and additional information is available at www.ok4saving.org. The winner will be randomly selected and formally announced shortly after the sweepstakes concludes.

The sweepstakes is open to Oklahoma residents who are parents, grandparents or legal guardians who are at least 21 years old and have a child or grandchild 16 years old or younger who is also an Oklahoma resident.

OCSP serves almost 30,000 account owners with more than $850 million in college savings assets. OCSP account owners make an average monthly contribution of $269 to their accounts. (Data through 12/31/17.)  For more facts and figure about how Oklahomans are saving for college, visit www.ok4saving.org/documents/OK_infographic_may2018.pdf.

For more information about the Oklahoma 529 College Savings Plan visit www.ok4saving.org or call (877) 654-7284. Funding for OCSP prizes comes from the marketing budget of the Oklahoma 529 College Savings Plan; no state funds are used.

 About the OCSP

 Introduced in April 2000, the Oklahoma 529 College Saving Plan (OCSP) is Oklahoma’s direct-sold 529 college savings plan. It is designed for families who want to direct their own 529 college savings accounts. The plan is managed by TIAA-CREF Tuition Financing, Inc. Introduced in March 2009, OklahomaDream 529 Plan is offered through financial advisors and is managed by Allianz Global Investors.  As of April 30, 2018, combined assets in both plans exceed $1 billion.

Oklahoma taxpayers may deduct, from their Oklahoma adjusted gross income, up to $10,000 in contributions to the Oklahoma 529 College Savings Plan for individual taxpayers and up to $20,000 for taxpayers filing a joint return with a five-year carryforward. Read the Disclosure Booklet carefully.

Consider the investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses before investing in the Oklahoma College Savings Plan. Please visitwww.ok4saving.org or call toll-free 1-877-654-7284 for a Plan Disclosure Booklet containing this and more information. Read it carefully.

 Check with your home state to learn if it offers tax or other benefits such as financial aid, scholarships and protection from creditors for investing in its own 529 plan.  Investments in the Plan are neither insured nor guaranteed and there is the risk of investment loss.

 Taxpayers should seek advice based on their own particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor. If the funds aren’t used for qualified higher education expenses, a 10% penalty tax on earnings (as well as federal and state income taxes) may apply.     

 Investments in the Plan are neither insured nor guaranteed and there is the risk of investment loss.

TIAA-CREF Tuition Financing, Inc., Program Manager. TIAA-CREF Individual & Institutional Services, LLC, member FINRA and SIPC, distributor and underwriter for the Oklahoma College Savings Plan.

State Takes First Step toward Improving Auto Insurance Verification System

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OKLAHOMA CITY – The Oklahoma Office of Management and Enterprise Services (OMES) has awarded a contract for the new Oklahoma Compulsory Insurance Verification System (OCIVS). The new system, hosted by MV Solutions, Inc., will be overseen by the Oklahoma Insurance Department (OID). The current system has been managed by the Department of Public Safety (DPS). Senate Bill 115, passed in 2017, transferred authority of the system from DPS to OID.

“This will go a long way toward solving Oklahoma’s uninsured driver problem,” said Oklahoma Insurance Commissioner John D. Doak. “This brings us one step closer to creating a real-time, reliable database for law enforcement officers, court clerks, district attorneys and tag agents to verify auto insurance coverage. Those trying to drive without insurance are about to get a rude awakening.”

Commissioner Doak will notify all private passenger auto insurance companies in Oklahoma they are required to participate in OCIVS using a web service that allows access to the insurer’s real-time book of business. The previous system allowed companies to upload data on a weekly or monthly basis, making it difficult for OCIVS users to access current policy information. In order to create the most effective system possible, Commissioner Doak is committed to using every regulatory tool at his disposal to ensure that insurance companies comply with the requirements of the system.

Sen. Ron Sharp, R-Shawnee, was the principal Senate author of SB 115.

“Oklahoma has one of the highest rates of uninsured drivers in the nation,” said Sharp. “We have to change that. A better verification system can make a big difference. OID has the resources and regulatory authority to ensure compliance and manage the system efficiently.”

SB 115 was coauthored by Rep. Lewis Moore, R-Arcadia.

“Our state’s high number of uninsured drivers leads to higher premiums for everyone,” said Moore. “Once people realize this database is accurate and updating in real time, they’ll be much more likely to keep their auto insurance current instead of risking a costly fine.”

The new law authorizes the insurance commissioner to initiate an administrative proceeding against an insurance company that is not providing vehicle insurance policy information to the online verification system. It also allows for license plate numbers to be used for verification.

Commissioner Doak’s letter to private passenger auto insurance companies notifying them of the new requirements is linked below and attached to this email.

About the Oklahoma Insurance Department
The Oklahoma Insurance Department, an agency of the State of Oklahoma, is responsible for the education and protection of the insurance-buying public and for oversight of the insurance industry in the state.

Sen. Nathan Dahm calls on legislature to correct years of veto decisions

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‘Over the last eight years we have seen decisions from the governor that are out of step with the will of the people, with the Republican party platform, and with the Constitution.’—Sen. Nathan Dahm

Broken Arrow, OK – Sen. Nathan Dahm has started the process for legislators to call themselves back into session to pass legislation vetoed by Gov. Mary Fallin.

“Over the last eight years we have seen decisions from the governor that are out of step with the will of the people, with the Republican Party platform, and with the Constitution,” said Dahm, R-Broken Arrow. “We have seen Governor Fallin use her veto pen to kill bills that would have brought transparency and accountability to government, reined in out of control agency rules, get parents more involved in education, restore our Second Amendment rights, return local control back to communities, secure parental rights in healthcare decisions, streamline and modernize state government, restore private property rights, change the budgeting system for long term planning, and more. This would afford us the opportunity to correct those mistakes without having to wait another year to do so.”

In order to enter a special session, two-thirds of both the House and the Senate must agree to return.

“The Oklahoma Constitution allows for the Legislature to call itself back into session with two-thirds of both the House and the Senate. It appears likely we will return back to the Capitol for at least one more special session this summer or fall. If we will be returning for another session, it would seem an opportune time to simultaneously deal with these measures the Governor has vetoed,” Dahm said.

So far, the following members have already signed on to the resolution: Reps. Sean Roberts; Greg Babinec; Bobby Cleveland; Jeff Coody; Jon Echols; George Faught; Tom Gann; Lewis Moore; Zack Taylor; Kevin West; Rick West; Mark Lawson; and Sens. Nathan Dahm; Josh Brecheen; James Leewright; and Anthony Sykes.

Dahm has the first ever veto override of a Republican governor by a Republican legislature in state history. In 2014 Fallin vetoed HB2461, a pro-Second Amendment bill supported by the NRA, OK2A, and other gun rights groups when she included the bill in a group of vetoes in an attempt to force the legislature to focus on her preferred agenda items. The Legislature overrode the veto in a historic move and by doing so furthered Second Amendment protections that would have otherwise been stalled by Fallin.

Dahm represents Oklahoma’s 33rd district. He was first elected in 2012.

For more information, contact Sen. Nathan Dahm, 405-521-5551 or dahm@oksenate.gov.

Hand-Picked Group to Begin Wielding Powers over State Agencies

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A small group of unelected citizens, all appointed by Republican state leaders, will soon be exercising significant powers to decide how the state’s top agencies spend their funding and which services they should provide.
Legislators and Gov. Mary Fallin added $2 million to the state budget this year to pay for state agency audits to be conducted by a private firm and overseen by a commission of Oklahoma business leaders.
Conservative lawmakers say this private-sector approach work will uncover waste, fraud and unnecessary spending that goes beyond agencies’ legislative or constitutional directives.
But the new funding has drawn critics from both Republicans and Democrats, who say the audits are expensive and are likely to reveal little beyond agencies’ need for more money to carry out their core missions.
A larger concern, they argue, is that the state is potentially politicizing the audits and giving a group of businessmen undue influence over how the state spends taxpayer dollars.
A Focus on Cost-Cutting
The task of overseeing the audits falls to the newly formed, nine-member Agency Performance and Accountability Commission. The general concept of the group was spelled out in a billapproved by the Legislature and signed by Gov. Mary Fallin last year. Appointed by Fallin and GOP House and Senate leaders, the commission is in the process of hiring a firm that will conduct the first round of performance audits. Performance audits are designed look at how effective and efficient programs are.
Instead of just forwarding cost-saving recommendations to the audited agencies – the case with traditional audits – the law creating the commission says the agencies “shall implement the recommendations” unless otherwise directed by the Legislature.
That gives the group more powers than those of other private-led commissions that the Legislature created in the past. For example, the Incentive Evaluation Commission, charged with making recommendations on many business tax breaks, only had an advisory role and could not instruct agencies on what to cut or keep.
Rep. David Perryman, D-Chickasha, said he believes this is an attempt by lawmakers to circumvent the Legislature and agency directors who control spending decisions, with the goal of cutting budgets and shrinking government.
“Theoretically, under Oklahoma law, when an agency head is hired, they’re supposed to have expertise in wherever they are serving,” Perryman said. “So we are basically taking away their ability to function in their own areas of expertise and, instead, having this group come in and dictate that something needs to be done a certain way.”
Perryman said because just three Republicans – Fallin, Senate Pro Tempore Mike Schulz, R-Altus, and House Speaker Charles McCall, R-Atoka – had any say in selecting the members, he questions how objective and non-partisan the commission will be. The commission could “conceal” findings that might not coincide with the views of those leaders, giving political cover to cut budgets or reduce services, he said.
State Auditor and Inspector Gary Jones, a Republican who is running for governor, said he’s also concerned.
A request for proposal, which set out the scope of work for companies that wanted to bid, is proof that the audits won’t be independent or meet the standards his office must meet, he said.
Instead of honestly evaluating whether an agency is performing correctly, needs more money or can cut costs, the document specifically requires the firm to identify cost-cutting moves.
Among other things, the request says the firm “will be expected to explore savings” by identifying areas where the level of service exceeds what is necessary, or by consolidating agencies and privatizing services.
Jones said it’s improper for such a request to require the auditor to assume that costs need to be cut.
“You can’t have pre-determined outcomes,” he said.
Jones said his office was invited to bid on the audits or recommend who should do the audits. But he declined because he didn’t believe the request for proposal would allow him to perform a truly independent audit.
“We didn’t want any of our fingerprints on this,” he said.
He said concerns over politicizing the process would have been moot had Fallin not vetoed a billin 2013 to create the Joint Legislative Committee on Accountability.
Jones said his office would likely be able to perform the audit more cheaply than a private firm could. The state auditor’s office does not make a profit, and would be better qualified than a company that may not even be located in Oklahoma, he said.
 ‘A Fresh Look’
Republican leaders have defended the commission and expressed confidence in its members, who are volunteering without pay.
At the commission’s first meeting in December, McCall, the Speaker, called the effort a “fresh look” and said taking a “very private-sector approach” can be more productive than a traditional government audit.
“The vision for this commission is not to just look at financial matters – those are currently reviewed,” he said. “But this will look at the processes agencies use, the programs they are involved in and their structure and other various things.”
Senate leader Schulz added, “There never can be too much oversight” when it comes to deciding how taxpayers’ dollars are spent.
In a recent email to Oklahoma Watch, Schulz said, “It’s not surprising that Capitol insiders would reject the infusion of common sense and business acumen (the commission) will undoubtedly bring. Legislators, agency directors and taxpayers should expect (the commission) to provide actionable ideas and best practices that will ensure more efficient delivery of government services and expenditure of taxpayer dollars.”
Bob Sullivan, who heads the Tulsa-based oil and gas firm Sullivan and Company, is among those on the accountability commission. He also said commission members will bring a fresh perspective. The language requiring agencies to follow the recommendations is necessary because it gives “teeth” to their work.
“It makes me feel better that we are going to be spending time on something that has some chance of being implemented here,” he said.
Outlook for Audits 
The company that wins the bid to do the audits will face tight deadlines. A preliminary report is due Sept. 28, and a final one is due Dec. 31.
Only a small number of agencies will get a look this year. The commission is to audit the 20 largest state agencies on a rotating basis, but the $2 million in funding for fiscal year 2019 will only go so far.
The request for proposal, issued well before the 2019 budget was approved, says agencies that could be audited in the first year are the Oklahoma Tax Commission, Office of Management and Enterprise Services, the Department of Corrections, the Department of Public Safety, the District Attorneys Council and the Office of Juvenile Affairs.
The commission planned to meet May 9 to discuss its next steps and review proposals from five bidders. It also was expected to discuss when the Department of Education would be audited and how to pay for it.
But the meeting was called off when the group was told that its notice didn’t comply with the state Open Meeting Act. Another meeting will be scheduled.
The commission is required to publish its final report and a follow-up report online. The reports track whether agencies are following audit recommendations.

By Trevor Brown 
Oklahoma Watch

Ever wanted to own a herd of Bison? You can bid on them right now…..

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Have you ever wanted to own a herd of bison? If so, you can bid on 55 of them right now. The information can be found on the Oklahoma state surplus website (see link below).

The Bison have been wormed but have not had any vaccines and do not have any vet records. Therefore, you would be buying them as is.

If you happen to be the lucky one to have the winning bid you will be responsible for loading and removal of all the animals within 10 business days of the auction close.

The animals are located at the Foss State Park in Foss, Oklahoma.

Of course, that’s not all you can bid on. There are tons of other neat stuff there as well.  In the few short moments there I saw some air compressors, whistles, light poles, vehicles, travel trailers and lots of other things no person should be without.

If you are interested in the Bison, you will need to get your bid in before the deadline on May 16, 2018.

For more information visit: https://pay.apps.ok.gov/dcs/surplus/auction/index.php

 

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