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Monday, September 24, 2018

Cowboys Pull Out 30-14 Homecoming Victory over Maysville

 It was quite a show of offense last Friday night at Bob Givens Sports Complex by Ryan and Maysville.

It just did not result in a lot of points.

The Cowboys, however, had just enough firepower to record a 30-14 victory over the Warriors in Ryan’s homecoming game.

Photo by Sheree Hanson

Now the Cowboys hit the road for the third time in four games as they travel to Caddo tomorrow night. Kickoff is set for 7:30 p.m. Caddo is 1-2 on the year.

The Cowboys rolled up 453 total yards in the game but turnovers and the inability to convert two-point conversions kept the Cowboys from lighting up the scoreboard.

The Cowboy defense came up with a few big plays to thwart a number of Maysville scoring threats to help Ryan earn its third victory of the season.

Photo by Sheree Hanson

 

The Cowboys scored on their opening drive of the game marching 70 yards on seven plays. Skyler Parkhill covered the final four yards for the score. The two-point conversion failed, but Ryan held a 6-0 lead with 9:34 left in the first quarter.

Maysville threatened to answer the Cowboys’ score, but the Warriors’ drive bogged down after a delay of game penalty and a nine-yard loss on a quarterback sack by Parkhill on a fourth down play from the Ryan 28.

The Cowboys took over at their own 37 and it took Ryan only two plays to score. Parkhill picked up seven yards and then sophomore quarterback Grayson Tomberlin had a nifty 56-yard run for the score. The two-point conversion failed, but Ryan held a 12-0 advantage with 3:51 to play in the first period.

On the ensuing kickoff the Cowboys perfectly executed an onside kick as Andrew Villerreal combined to kick the ball and recover the onside kick giving Ryan possession at midfield.

It took Ryan seven plays to drive to the Maysville 33 and that is when the game’s momentum slipped from the grasp of the Cowboys. Talented Maysville quarterback and defensive back Gunner Aprill picked off an errant Tomberlin pass and returned the interception 41 yards to give Maysville possession at the Ryan 48.

Ryan HS Cheerleaders
Photo by Sheree Hanson

The Warriors drove the ball deep into Ryan territory, but Tomberlin picked off a pass in the end zone to keep the Warriors off the scoreboard.

The Cowboys turned the ball back over the Warriors just two plays later on a mishandled exchange and this time Maysville took advantage. On the first play of the drive, Aprill scampered 24 yards for the touchdown and also ran for the two points to cut Ryan’s lead to 12-8 with 7:30 left in the first half.

Ryan answered the score with a seven-play, 63-yard scoring drive. The big play of the drive was a 42-yard completion to Parkhill that gave the Cowboys a first-and-goal at the Warrior seven.

Photo by Sheree Hanson

After a loss and a 10-yard penalty, Kalen Weldon picked up 16 yards on a counter and then Tomberlin found Parkhill across the middle of the end zone for a four-yard touchdown pass. Again the Cowboys failed to convert the two-point try, but led 18-8 with 3:33 left before intermission.

Maysville answered the Cowboy score quickly. A 25-yard kickoff return put the Warriors in business at the Ryan 45 and in just three plays went the distance for the score. Aprill found Damon McCallister behind the Cowboy defense for a 47-yard touchdown pass. The try for two failed, but with 2:02 left before the half the Warriors had trimmed the lead to 18-14.

The Cowboys threatened to score again by driving to the Maysville 25, but the Warriors intercepted another pass in the end zone to turn back the Cowboys and the half ended with Maysville running out the remaining seconds.

Photo by Sheree Hanson

On Maysville’s opening drive of the second half Aprill took the Warriors from their own 36 to the Ryan 32 as he carried the ball on every play with the exception of one pass incompletion. Ryan stopped the Warriors on fourth down and took the ball over on downs.

The Cowboys took 11 plays to move 72 yards with Weldon’s key 21-yard spectacular catch keeping the drive alive on a fourth down. Parkhill went around left end for the final 12 yards and Ryan held a 24-14 lead with 4:03 left in the third quarter.

Maysville went on another long drive and moved the ball to the Ryan 23, but on fourth down Villerreal chased down Aprill for a six-yard loss that gave the Cowboys the ball on downs.

On the third play of the drive Tomberlin found Parkhill open on the left side and after the Cowboy senior dodged a couple of tacklers, he sprinted 71 yards for the score with 9:00 left in the game. The run for two points failed again, but Ryan was in front, 30-14.

Two of Maysville’s final three drives resulted in the Cowboy defense getting key stops on fourth downs to help preserve the victory.

Tomberlin and Parkhill accounted for most of the 453 total yards on offense for the Cowboys.

Parkhill set the school record for most yards receiving in a game with 189 yards on just seven receptions. He also rushed six times for 30 yards.

Tomberlin finished with 151 yards rushing on 19 carries. He was 12 of 20 passing for 249 yards, but he did have three interceptions.

On defense, Tomberlin and Parkhill played big roles. Tomberlin was in on 17 tackles on the night, while Parkhill added nine stops. Villerreal, who had 11 tackles, and Parkhill put pressure on the Maysville quarterback much of the night.

COWBOY CORRAL: The win broke a two-game losing streak in homecoming games for Ryan not including last year’s homecoming game with Grandfield which Ryan won by forfeit…..Ryan now leads the short series with Maysville, 4-2….This was the first meeting between the two schools in an eight-man game….The last time Ryan played Maysville was in 1975 with the Cowboys coming away with a 9-6 victory….Tomberlin’s passing performance was the sixth most yards passing by a quarterback in school history….It was also the sixth most passing yards by a Cowboy team in school history….The 12 receptions in the game ties for the ninth most in a single game in school history along with the 12 receptions in a 1940 contest with Grandfield…The 30 points scored by Ryan is the second most in the series with Maysville just behind the 34 points scored in a 34-0 victory by the 1974 squad….The 1988 Ryan Cowboys, the first Ryan football team to play for a state title, were introduced at halftime along with coaches Phil Elerick and Gordon Garner.

Game in Figures

                                MHS         RHS

First Downs             14            14

Yards Rushing         49-218     29-204

Yards Passing         77            249

Passes                     2-6           12-21

Passes Int. By          3              1

Fumbles, Lost          2-0           1-1

Punts                       0              0

Penalties                  6-35         6-45

                SCORE BY QUARTERS

Maysville  0              14            0              0–14

Ryan        12            6              6              6–30

                FIRST QUARTER

RYAN – Skyler Parkhill 4 run (run failed), 9:34

RYAN – Grayson Tomberlin 56 run (run failed), 3:51

                SECOND QUARTER

MAYSVILLE – Gunner Aprill 24 run (Aprill run), 7:30

RYAN – Parkhill 4 pass from Tomberlin (run failed), 3:33

MAYSVILLE – Damon McCallister 47 pass from Aprill (run failed), 2:02

                THIRD QUARTER

RYAN – Tomberlin 12 run (run failed), 4:03

                FOURTH QUARTER

RYAN – Parkhill 71 pass from Tomberlin (run failed), 9:00

                INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS

MAYSVILLE – Rushing: Aprill 35-166, Bentley Stevens 3-22, Junior Simmons 6-12, Luke Dobson 2-9, Jacob Owen 1-7, McCallister 2-2; Passing: Simmons 0-2-0-0; Aprill 2-4-77-1; Receiving: McCallister 2-11.

RYAN – Rushing: Tomberlin 19-151, Parkhill 6-30, Kalen Weldon 1-16, Travis Fristoe 1-8, Gunner Phillips 2- -1; Passing: Parkhill 0-1-0-0; Tomberlin 12-20-249-3; Receiving: Parkhill 7-189, Weldon 2-48, Fristoe 1-10, Andrew Villerreal 1-5, Phillips 1- -3; Tackles: Tomberlin 17, Villerreal 11, Parkhill 9, Weldon 7,  Justin Williams 5, Walter Snider 4, Gunner Phillips 3, Trey Bryant 3, Pacen Wiest 3, Sam Brown 2.

Ryan Homecoming Parade & Homecoming Week Pictures

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The Junior Float won 1st Place Photo by Sheree Hanson

Here are pictures from the Ryan Homecoming Parade:

The Sophomore Float
Photo by Sheree Hanson
Freshman Float won 2nd place.
Photo by Sheree Hanson
Eighth Grade won 3rd Place
Photo by Sheree Hanson
PreK & Kindergarten won 3rd Place
Photo by Sheree Hanson
First and Second Grade Float
Photo by Sheree Hanson
Third and Fourth Grade won 1st Place
Photo by Sheree Hanson
Fifth & Sixth Grade won 2nd Place
Photo by Sheree Hanson
Senior Float
Photo by Sheree Hanson
The Junior Float won 1st Place
Photo by Sheree Hanson
The Seventh Grade Float
Photo by Sheree Hanson
Ryan High School Cheerleaders
Photo by Sheree Hanson
Ryan High School Cheerleaders
Photo by Sheree Hanson
Tonya Bryant on Sports Day
Photo by Sheree Hanson
Danielle and Mrs. Rhoades on Sports Day
Photo by Sheree Hanson
Photo by Sheree Hanson
Photo by Sheree Hanson
Photo by Sheree Hanson
Photo by Sheree Hanson

Impact of Ryan’s Coach West Goes Far Beyond Athletic Circles

 You might expect when a sports writer is asked to write a tribute to someone the focus would be on that person’s accomplishments as a coach or player.

 But, this article will be focused more on the person than his accomplishments.

Last week a large crowd gathered at Ryan’s First Baptist Church to say goodbye to legendary Ryan coach and principal, Raymon West.

Most anyone that has been under the instruction of Mr. West would probably choose to focus on the man because   

his contribution to the lives of people went far beyond the football field, basketball court or baseball diamond if they were tasked with writing a tribute.

As Bro. Mark Kunkel, pastor of the First Baptist Church of Terral, said numerous times while conducting the service, everyone was mostly there to honor the man Mr. West and not Coach West.

However, well over half the crowd identified themselves at one point in the service as having been coached by Coach West.

And certainly his coaching ability is not to be overlooked, but each person who has come under the influence of Mr. West would probably be quick to agree with Bro. Kunkel and this writer that his greatest achievements were what he poured into our lives.

You see the goal of Mr. West was not really to produce great athletes – although that did happen. His goal was to prepare high school students for life.

And, for the most part he was a master at teaching life lessons.

Mr. West was tough. He was a disciplinarian. However, he correctly knew that making life a bit difficult in the athletic arena would serve each person well when they began to tackle life as a young adult.

And, some of those lessons not only served us well as young adults, but throughout our life time.

As was noted in the funeral service, Mr. West cared deeply for people. He endeared himself to most every athlete he ever coached and those he taught.

The compassion Mr. West had for people carried over to his retirement years as he served people through his church and was frequently present when a need had to be met in the community.

Everything Mr. West did was with great passion – his family, ranching, teaching and coaching.

Mr. West’s accomplishments in the coaching profession should not go without mention. He was inducted into the Oklahoma Girls Basketball Coaches Hall of Fame in 1988. Most everyone knows he coached the 1965 Cowgirl squad that won the Class B state championship – the only state title in school history. He coached the Cowgirls for a total of 13 seasons.

He coached the Cowboy basketball team for 15 seasons and took the 1962 squad to the state tournament – one of only two boys’ teams to advance into the state tournament.

Mr. West’s contributions to the football program are more notable than most people might think. He coached football on three different occasions – in 1958, 1962-1963 and 1977-1980. The 1962 squad just missed out on a district title and finished 8-2 which tied the 1929 football team for the second most wins in a season up to that time.

 It is likely that one of the key decisions made by Mr. West while serving as principal and head football coach at Ryan was moving from 11-man football to eight-man football following the 1977 season. The decision probably saved the football program and he coached the Cowboys to the playoffs in the first year of eight-man football.

Mr. West also coached baseball in the early years at Ryan.

In the four sports coached by Mr. West, he led squads to 14 conference championships, three county championships, seven bi-county championships, 10 district titles, three regional crowns and one state championship.

No tribute, however, would be complete without personal stories because Mr. West had a profound impact on my life.

Late during my eighth-grade year and Mr. West’s first year back at Ryan after having coached at Burkburnett, Texas and Duncan, he noticed right away that my athletic genes were just about non-existent.

Mr. West came to me and asked me if I would be interested in being the student trainer, which I did after football season that year. He sent me that following summer by bus to Baylor University to attend the National Athletic Trainers Association annual convention.

I was definitely way out of my league (can you imagine a kid who just completed eighth grade going on a trip like that alone?), but I learned a few things and spent the rest of my high school days helping with all sports. Mr. West saw potential in me that I did not see in myself and giving me that responsibility helped me stay connected to sports.

As you can imagine we spent a lot of time together during basketball practices. During that time I learned a lot about basketball, but did not fail to pick up one or two life lessons along the way.

One of those came one afternoon after Ryan had suffered a loss in a game that was not well-officiated. And, as I have a tendency to do even today, I was griping about how poorly the officials called the game the night before.

I suppose Mr. West had heard enough and he looked at me and said, “You worry about the things you have control over. We have no control over the officiating.”

That little tidbit has remained with me through the years and has been invaluable in my life’s journey.

In the years following whenever I would make my way to Ryan I would try to make sure I came in contact with Mr. West.

A side note – most anyone coached by Mr. West were all afraid to ever call him anything but Mr. West or Coach West. It was always difficult to address him as “Raymon.” But, that is the kind of respect he commanded and deserved.

Many others and in particular his family could share similar stories about how Mr. West impacted their lives. I am just fortunate I had the opportunity to be the one to write this article.

I believe it is pretty easy to come to one conclusion – there will never be another Raymon West.

Ryan Celebrates Their 2018 Football Homecoming

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Sam Brown and Holland Carter Photo by Sheree Hanson

 Ryan celebrated Homecoming Friday evening. Holland Carter was crowned Homecoming Queen by Sam Brown (King).

Also during the evening the 1988 Ryan Cowboys were honored.

(l-r) Raesh Barrett, Alyssa Tags, Skylar Wickware, Liberti Sewell, Mike Regehr, Skyler Parkhill, Samantha Good, Sam Brown, Holland Carter, Travis Fristoe, Lily York, Pacen Weist, Kalen Weldon, Tawny Vanover, Justin Williams, Carson Cooper, Libby Carter, Caleb Perrin
Front Fow: Zayden Alexander and Melanie Villarreal Photo by Sheree Hanson
LEFT TO RIGHT: ALYSSA TAGS 7TH GRADE CANDIDATE, LIBERTI SEWELL 9TH GRADE CANDIDATE, SAMANTHA GOOD 11TH GRADE CANDIDATE, HOLLAND CARTER HOMECOMING QUEEN, LILY YORK CANDIDATE AT LARGE, TAWNY VANOVER 10TH GRADE CANDIDATE, LIBBY CARTER 8TH GRADE CANDIDATE. FRONT ROW CROWN BARER ZAYDEN ALEXANDER, FLOWER GIRL MELANIE VILLARREAL.
Photo by Sheree Hanson
Holland Carter and Sam Brown were the ring bearers for homecoming when they were in Kindergarten. This past week they were honored as this year’s King and Queen of Homecoming.
Congratulations!

Waurika Softball Seniors Honored at final home game of season

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(l-r) Destiny Barnes, Madison Roberson, Madison Christian, and Olivia Ralls Photo by Tonya Forsyth

 by Katelyn Washburn and EagleTalk staff  

WHS Senior softball players played their last home game Tuesday, September 11 against the Ryan Cowgirls.  While the game ended in a loss for the Lady Eagles, the team still celebrated by recognizing its four senior players:  Destiny Barnes, Madison Christian, Olivia Ralls, and Madison Roberson.

Barnes has played softball for WHS since she was a freshman, and has mixed emotions about the season coming to an end. “I am happy it is our last home game and upset we lost.  I’m kind of sad that it is over.”  Christian agreed, stating “I’m happy that it was the last home game, but sad we lost, and [the season] is almost over. The game didn’t go as well as we wanted.”

As is true with most events during a senior year, senior Lady Eagles girls had mixed emotions about the season wrapping up.  Olivia Ralls was also happy that it was their last home game, but added, “I’m sad knowing that I will never be able to play again.”

Madison Roberson summed it up best, saying, “It was sad, but a good night. We may have lost, but we all were in high spirits and that’s really all that matters to me in softball.”

Head softball coach Sloan Roberson spoke fondly of the four Lady Eagles who will be leaving WHS after this school year.  “Our last home game was awesome,” Coach Roberson stated.  “We honored four seniors for their hard work and dedication during their years of softball.”  

Two of the seniors, Madison Roberson and Destiny Barnes, were career Lady Eagles.  “Madison Roberson was a 4 year starter for the Lady Eagles and a huge asset to the team.  She held pitcher, catcher 3rd base, 2nd base and short stop duties throughout her career.   She also had the one of the highest batting averages on the team for each of the four years.

Destiny Barnes was also a 4 year starter for the Lady Eagles.  She was a huge asset on the mound. She was penned the name ‘Hoover’ for her amazing skills at 3rds base as well,” Coach Roberson stated. 

Roberson also spoke well of the two seniors who came to WHS in the middle of their high school softball careers.  

“Madison Christian played for the Lady Eagles for 3 years.  She was always there to root for her teammates and did anything and played any position she was asked.  She was an amazing center fielder and was always there with a positive attitude.

“Olivia Ralls was a 2 year Lady Eagle softball player.  She came to us from Texas and was always willing to give 110% every time she stepped on the field.  We will miss her enthusiasm and team spirit”

2018 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Presenters Announced: Individual Tickets On-Sale Now

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September 14, 2018 OKLAHOMA CITY – The accomplished Oklahomans being inducted into the 2018 Oklahoma Hall of Fame class each have selected a friend or colleague to formally present them at the November banquet and induction ceremony.

The 2018 Oklahoma Hall of Fame presenters are: Dave McLaughlin, Oklahoma City, presenting Paul Allen; John Davis, Austin, TX, presenting Mo Anderson; Ladd Drummond, Pawhuska, presenting Ree Drummond; Clayton I. Bennett, Oklahoma City, presenting David Rainbolt; David L. Boren, Norman, presenting Jon R. Stuart; Bryan White, Nashville, TN, presenting Carrie Underwood; Freddy Jenkins and Anita Arnold will accept the medallion on behalf of Charlie Christian, who is being honored posthumously.   The 2018 Class will be formally inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame on Thursday, November 15, in Tulsa.

A limited number of individual tickets to the 2018 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony are on sale now and exclusively available by contacting Brenda Schwartz, Director of Honoree Relations, at 405.523.3209, or at bbs@oklahomahof.com. The 91st class will be inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame on the evening of November 15 at the Renaissance Tulsa Hotel & Convention Center.  These accomplished Oklahomans will join the cast of 691 individuals who have been inducted into the Hall since 1928.  In celebration of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame’s 91st Induction Ceremony, past Inductees Becky Dixon and Jane Jayroe Gamble will serve as Mistresses of Ceremonies.

For more information about the Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony, including pricing information and a description of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame Patron levels, please visit OklahomaHoF.com.

Being inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame is Oklahoma’s highest honor.  The portraits of the 2018 Inductees will be added to the permanent collection held by the Oklahoma Hall of Fame at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum in Oklahoma City. Their biographies, photos and videos can be viewed through interactive exhibits in the Oklahoma Hall of Fame Gallery, along with stories of all Honorees.

The Oklahoma Hall of Fame preserves Oklahoma’s history by telling Oklahoma’s story through its people. Founded in 1927, the Oklahoma Hall of Fame was created to honor Oklahomans who have given outstanding service to the state during their lifetime and to provide educational programming for students of all ages. Through exhibits and experiences at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum, the Oklahoma Hall of Fame stands to preserve Oklahoma’s unique history while promoting pride in our great state.  For more information about the Oklahoma Hall of Fame or Gaylord-Pickens Museum, visit oklahomahof.com or call 405.235.4458.

Bartlesville’s Kevin Potter Reappointed to Aeronautics Commission

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OKLAHOMA CITY – Gov. Mary Fallin has reappointed Kevin Potter of Bartlesville to represent District 1 on the Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission.

District 1 encompasses all of Tulsa, Wagoner and Washington counties, as well as small portions of Creek and Rogers counties in northeastern Oklahoma. Potter’s term will expire Dec. 31, 2024.

“I have learned a great deal during my tenure serving on the Aeronautics Commission,” said Potter. “Due to a statewide study in 2017, we now know that aviation and aerospace is the second largest industry in our state with a $44 billion annual economic impact.  Because of these new findings, Oklahoma aviation has been energized. The Aeronautics Commission is positioned to facilitate continued aerospace commerce growth.  I am proud to be part of the team to help the State of Oklahoma advance the aviation and aerospace sector.”

Potter is president and general manager of Bartlesville Radio.  A licensed private pilot who has flown for nearly 30 years, Potter and his wife, Dorea, have owned and operated Radio Broadcasting since 1980, which consists of four radio stations located in and around the Bartlesville area, and four radio stations in Coffeyville, Kansas. Prior to their move to Bartlesville, the couple owned and operated two radio stations for 15 years while living in Monmouth, Ill.

Potter currently serves on the board of directors for the Oklahoma Broadcasters Association, Salvation Army and the Oklahoma Wesleyan University Foundation. He is also an active member of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and Rotary Club.

Potter played college football at Cameron University in Lawton, Okla., where he also earned his bachelor’s degree.

 

The mission of the Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission is to promote aviation, which includes ensuring that the needs of commerce and communities across the state are met by the state’s 108 publicly owned airports that comprise the Oklahoma Airport System, and helping ensure the viability of the state’s aerospace industry.

 

Aviation Industry Facts:

 

The Oklahoma Aviation & Aerospace Industry produces just under $44B in annual economic activity, making it the second largest economic engine in our state. Three segments account for the $44B total: Military aviation, $19.3B; off-airport aviation and aerospace businesses, $13.9B; and the 108 commercial and general aviation airports, $10.6B.  Aviation & Aerospace supports 206,000 jobs totaling an $11.7B payroll. The average salary in the industry is $73,300 making it one of the highest average salaries in the state.

New Oklahoma Documentary Chronicling Opioid Addiction Epidemic

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OKLAHOMA CITY – Killing Pain, a seven part documentary series chronicling the state’s opioid addiction epidemic launched this week and is available to view, free of charge, on https://www.killingpain.com/.

The in-depth documentary explores the public health crisis in Oklahoma from its origin to steps the state is currently taking to stem the epidemic. The series is presented by Fighting Addiction Through Education (FATE) and produced by Lampstand Media.

The series also features personal stories of addiction, the economic cost of the crisis and the biology of addiction.

Attorney General Mike Hunter appears in multiple episodes to discuss the state’s response and the lawsuit filed by his office last July.

“Killing Pain is a pioneering series that shines light on the tragic story of how our state got in this position and why we are close to ground zero in terms of the addiction epidemic,” Attorney General Hunter said. “I encourage all Oklahomans watch this gripping documentary that covers the many tragic aspects of the crisis and how it impacts all of us. Although the reality of the story is painful, the good news is, Oklahoma is rising to meet this challenge. State officials, business leaders and community organizers are tired of watching our families suffer and are stepping up and doing something about it.

“I appreciate Reggie Whitten and his organization, FATE, for presenting this project and Lampstand for the wonderful care and craftsmanship in which they took in producing it.”

Whitten, who is also a law partner at Whitten – Burrage, founded FATE after the tragic overdose death of his son, Brandon.

“This documentary is part of my ongoing personal mission to show Oklahomans this epidemic is real and it is on our doorstep,” Whitten said. “I also want people to know there is hope and there is help for those who are struggling. No parent should ever have to go through the pain and suffering of losing a child. There is not a day that goes by that I don’t think about Brandon. I want people to know his story and the thousands of other stories that are similar. The more people we can get to understand the realities of the crisis, the more lives of Oklahomans we will save.”

Other prominent Oklahomans interviewed for the series are U.S. Sen. James Lankford, Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater, Commissioner for the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services Terri White and Assistant Clinical Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychiatry, Behavioral Sciences at Oklahoma State University-Center for Health Sciences Dr. Jason Beamon and more.

Founded in 2010, Lampstand tells powerful stories through film to move people to action and change the world around them. Lampstand works with a variety of clients from corporations to nonprofits, long form docs to social campaigns. The company’s work has been featured on Netflix, PBS, National Geographic and with client around the world in over 30 countries and on six continents.

FATE is a nonprofit educational outreach program that seeks to shed a light on the dangers of addiction and substance abuse in Oklahoma. FATE also focuses on motivational efforts to encourage individuals who are suffering from addiction to get help.

Waurika Library News

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 Story Time returns to the Waurika Public Library every Wednesday at 10:00 a.m.  We read stories to the children and after Story Time there are games and computers that the children can use.  Next week, we’ll read “Our Day at the Zoo” released by the Oklahoma City Zoo and Metropolitan Library System.

The Oklahoma City Zoo and Metropolitan Library System rolled out a new, statewide literacy program called Read for Adventure. This program aims to promote literacy within families, increase their contact with the outdoors and provide an outlet for invaluable, nature-inspired discoveries.  Educating Oklahomans about wildlife and wild places has always been central to the OKC Zoo’s mission and through this partnership, are inspiring children to read about wildlife and connect with those same animals and plants at the Zoo.  

For this program the OKC Zoo and Metropolitan Library System introduced the children’s book “Our Day at the Zoo”.  The story is about children that visit and imitate a variety of animals on a trip to the OKC Zoo and Botanical Garden.  The book is available for check out at the Waurika Public Library and patrons that check out “Our Day at the Zoo” will receive one free voucher good for general admission for four people to the Oklahoma City Zoo good through March 31, 2019. 

The FRIENDS of the Waurika Public Library Fall Used Book Sale is coming soon.  The Used Book Sale is currently scheduled for Saturday, Oct 27th from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the annex across from the library.  We’ll have lots of books to choose from at great prices.  Don’t miss it!

The Waurika Public Library increases our selection every week.  Recent additions include books from authors such as Sue Grafton, James Patterson, Nora Roberts, Stuart Woods, David Baldacci and more.  Come check them out!

For information about events, activities and more, visit our Facebook group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/WaurikaPublicLibrary/

Are New Water Meters in Ryan’s Future?

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 The council voted to apply for a grant that will enable the town of Ryan to purchase new electronic water meters that will be more accurate and tamper proof.

 If the REAP grant is awarded to the town of Ryan, the new meters will allow city employees to accurately read the meters with electronic equipment. The meters can also notify city employees automatically if anyone tampers with them in anyway. 

This will cut down on citizens turning the water meters on and off without notifying city hall. This has been an ongoing problem for some time. 

In other business, Dennis Underwood addressed the council about the instillation of a Christmas Tree in the intersection of 5th and Washington during the Christmas Season. 

Coach Stan Mueggenborg will be constructing the permanent tree stand that will be embedded in the center of the intersection. He assured the council members that it will be done professionally and will not detract from the aesthetics of the brick street. 

The council agreed to let the project go forward. 

Some at the meeting were wondering why city employees no longer decorated business downtown with Christmas lights. It was explained that this tradition was stopped because it is a liability to the Town of Ryan for its employees to be decorating private businesses. 

Business owners are free to decorate their businesses for the Christmas Season if they so wish. 

There was also a vote to allow other members of the city council to sign and receive REAP grant awards. 

In other business, it was decided that a calender will be utilized to schedule use of city owned property such as the city park. 

Anyone wanting to use the park in the future will need to stop by city hall and reserve the date. At this time there is no cost for using the park. 

During the meeting all the bills and claims were paid. 

The council also voted to raise the pay of Michelle Mellow $87.50 per pay period. 

It was noted during the meeting that Michelle Mellow does not sign checks. 

Dylan Sheffield addressed the council on behalf of the Regeneration and Community Beautification Group and informed them of a fundraiser scheduled for Sunday September 16th. The group is also scheduling a Fall Festival in October. 

Once all business was dispensed with, the meeting was adjourned. 

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