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Sunday, January 20, 2019

Cameron University alumnus Hon. Emmit Tayloe to address Class of 2018

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The Hon. Emmit Tayloe, a Cameron University alumnus and judge for Oklahoma’s Fifth Judicial District, will deliver the commencement address to Cameron’s Class of 2018. The annual graduation ceremony is slated for Friday, May 4 at 7:30 p.m. at Cameron Stadium. Following Tayloe’s address, CU’s 2018 graduates will receive their diplomas. A fireworks display will cap off the occasion. The public is invited to attend free of charge. No tickets are required.

“Throughout his professional life, Judge Emmit Tayloe has demonstrated integrity, character, and a genuine sense of caring about the Lawton/Fort Sill community,” says Cameron President John McArthur. “He is an outstanding role model for this year’s Cameron graduates, who can find inspiration in his dedication and service to others.”

Since earning a Bachelor of Arts degree from Cameron University in 1980, Lawton native Emmit Tayloe has experienced a career that has seen him open a private law practice, serve as an assistant district attorney and, since April 2014, hold the position of judge for Oklahoma’s Fifth Judicial District.  During each phase of his career, he has demonstrated care, enthusiasm, diligence and fairness.

Attending Cameron on a debate scholarship, Tayloe majored in speech and was a member of CU’s National Championship Speech Team in 1979.  He also served fellow students as vice president of the university’s Student Government Association.

Admitted to the bar in 1983 after earning his juris doctorate from the University of Oklahoma, Tayloe was appointed as a Comanche County assistant district attorney. In 1986, he opened a private practice in Lawton, where he specialized in both civil and criminal law. After his appointment to the Fifth Judicial District, Tayloe served as chief judge in 2016 and 2017 and as community sentencing judge since 2016.  He also initiated the Community Sentencing Diversion Program in 2016, which has been used by more than 100 defendants to date.

Professionally, Tayloe is an active member of the Oklahoma Bar Association and the Comanche County Bar Association, where he has served as president and vice president. He is a Fellow of the Oklahoma Bar Foundation. He has been actively involved in Comanche County’s Teen Court for more than 20 years as past chairman of its board of directors and as presiding judge.

Tayloe serves on the Preserving the Record task force, a statewide effort to address the current shortage of court reporters, and he was responsible for obtaining funding from the Oklahoma Bar Foundation to install video systems in all seven courtrooms in the Comanche County Courthouse, as well as the adult and juvenile detention centers. He also serves on the Executive Board for the Judicial Conference with the Chief and Vice-Chief of the Oklahoma Supreme Court.

He has continued his involvement with Cameron University, acting as judge for the Business Department’s annual Ethics Bowl competition.  In 2016, he was honored as one of Cameron’s Distinguished Alumni. He currently serves on the board of directors for the Cameron University Alumni Association.

A fourth generation Oklahoman, Tayloe has ties to Fort Sill, where his father retired as a Master Sergeant. He is active in the Kiwanis Club and served as a deacon and elder in his church.  Tayloe and his wife of more than 30 years, Dolina, have three children and four grandchildren.

Ryan FFA News September 27 2018

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Front Row (left to right): Ethan Burden, Riley Ross. Back Row (left to right): Rylee Townsend, Alicen Williams, Madisen Rhoades, Savannah Lashley, Pacen Wiest, Mike Regher, and Ms. Welchel

 OKC, OK- On September 16, 2018, Members of the Ryan FFA chapter volunteered their time at the Oklahoma State Fair in the Agtropolis building. Members had the opportunity to work “Farmer for a day” station, this activity allows our members to interact with children from around the state of Oklahoma while teaching them about agricultural practices. Each member that attended did a tremendous job representing our chapter while advocating for agriculture.

Alicen Williams and Riley Ross work the cashier station at the “Farmer for a day” activity.

 

Ethan Burden teaches a child how to gather
eggs from chickens.

 

Mike Regher shows a child how to properly plant a corn seed.

 

Front Row (left to right): Ethan Burden, Riley Ross.
Back Row (left to right): Rylee Townsend, Alicen Williams, Madisen Rhoades, Savannah Lashley, Pacen Wiest, Mike Regher, and Ms. Welchel

Beating the Odds

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By Lauren Hobbs

He has been beating the odds his entire life.

When his mother Tracy Woods was 6 months pregnant with him it was discovered that he  had one kidney larger than the other which led to a birth defect.

After many test he had surgery a month before he was 2 years old to fix his kidneys.

At the age of 3 his mother noticed he was not hitting the developmental milestones he was supposed to.

He was tested for autism and was diagnosed with pervasive development delay with autistic tendencies.

The doctor’s said they were not sure if he would ever be able to speak.

Click the above ad to visit Terri’s Facebook page!

Braden started headstart at age three.

While he was in Kindergarten he had the good fortune to be taught by Jeri Donn McCauley.

Tracy still get’s tears in her eyes when she talks about McCauley.

McCauley was like a God-Send. She would never give up on Brandon and continued to push him to do better.

Woods continued to improve.

Through his elementary school years he was winning school competitions and science fairs.

In his freshman year be began to really shine.

He was the new comer of the year on the academic team.

He placed 5th in the USAO interscholastic in Oklahoma History.

He placed 4th in American History at the Cameron interscholastic meet.

In his sophomore he place 1st in American History at the Cameron interscholastic meet which qualified to attend the tournament of champs in Oklahoma City where he tied for 3rd place.

Also during his sophomore year he qualified for the National Honor Society.

His junior year he was a member of the Beta Club, and he was the 3rd runner up for Mr. and Mrs. WHS.

Woods senior year has been productive and rewarding as well.

He has been named an ambassador for the Red River VoTech, which allowed him to give tours to prospective students.

He was also named to the National Technical Honor Society through the Red River Vo-Tech.

Woods was the runner up in Social Studies at the Beta Club Convention in Norman.

He earned an “Excellent” rating at the Oklahoma Scholastic Media Online Critique column.

On top of all of that he made honorable mention at the All State Academic Bowl.

He also scored a 30 on his ACT.

Woods participated in the Sooner Discovery program.

Woods has been accepted to attend Oklahoma University this coming fall where he has been awarded a $10,000.00 tuition waiver.

While attending OU, he may also try out for the band.

When Woods graduates at the end of this semester he will be recognized as an Eagle Scholar.

Braden Woods continued so defy the odds and overcome them, it only stands to reason that he will continue to do so in the future.

We wish him continued success as he advances with his life.

Cody Simmons Reflects on the Transition from Principal to Superintendent

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Although he began his student teaching in Waurika back in 2004, his history with Waurika schools goes back further than that. 

His family have deep roots in Jefferson County. 

After beginning his student teaching, he was hired soon thereafter in January of 2005 as the second grade teacher at the Elementary. 

For the past eight years he has served as the Elementary Principal. 

By now, everyone is probably aware that Cody Simmons is the new Waurika Public Schools Superintendent beginning July of this year. 

Over the past couple of weeks the reality of the role has sunk in. 

He says he has been getting more familiar with the high school.

Cody said he recently met with the high school principal and the athletic director. 

He is becoming more familiar with the high school.

The adjustment for him will be managing the overall school system rather than just the Elementary. 

He says he is looking forward to the new experience. 

Simmons says that one of his expectations for the upcoming year is to close the gap between the Elementary and the High School. 

He would like to see the school system be more of a whole than separate parts (Elementary, Middle School, and High School).

During his time as principal, the Elementary has achieved “Blue Ribbon” status. 

That status is determined by the test scores over three consecutive years. 

Simmons is a busy man.

 

Besides being a full time school administrator, he also enjoys mowing yards, working out, and most of all spending time with his family. 

He says right now they are enjoying ball games several nights per week. 

Simmons is also deeply involved in the community.

He was instrumental in the establishment of the Veterans Park downtown. 

He is quick to give credit to others who have assisted in the success of the park. 

Craig Williams, he says was gracious to add his professional touch to the landscaping. 

Simmons also attributes the success of the Elementary, including its “Blue Ribbon” status, to the hard work and dedication of the teachers. 

“I feel like the teachers here are all high quality enthusiastic professional teachers. Whenever you surround yourself with [people like ] that good things will happen,” Simmons says .

Impact of Ryan’s Coach West Goes Far Beyond Athletic Circles

 You might expect when a sports writer is asked to write a tribute to someone the focus would be on that person’s accomplishments as a coach or player.

 But, this article will be focused more on the person than his accomplishments.

Last week a large crowd gathered at Ryan’s First Baptist Church to say goodbye to legendary Ryan coach and principal, Raymon West.

Most anyone that has been under the instruction of Mr. West would probably choose to focus on the man because   

his contribution to the lives of people went far beyond the football field, basketball court or baseball diamond if they were tasked with writing a tribute.

As Bro. Mark Kunkel, pastor of the First Baptist Church of Terral, said numerous times while conducting the service, everyone was mostly there to honor the man Mr. West and not Coach West.

However, well over half the crowd identified themselves at one point in the service as having been coached by Coach West.

And certainly his coaching ability is not to be overlooked, but each person who has come under the influence of Mr. West would probably be quick to agree with Bro. Kunkel and this writer that his greatest achievements were what he poured into our lives.

You see the goal of Mr. West was not really to produce great athletes – although that did happen. His goal was to prepare high school students for life.

And, for the most part he was a master at teaching life lessons.

Mr. West was tough. He was a disciplinarian. However, he correctly knew that making life a bit difficult in the athletic arena would serve each person well when they began to tackle life as a young adult.

And, some of those lessons not only served us well as young adults, but throughout our life time.

As was noted in the funeral service, Mr. West cared deeply for people. He endeared himself to most every athlete he ever coached and those he taught.

The compassion Mr. West had for people carried over to his retirement years as he served people through his church and was frequently present when a need had to be met in the community.

Everything Mr. West did was with great passion – his family, ranching, teaching and coaching.

Mr. West’s accomplishments in the coaching profession should not go without mention. He was inducted into the Oklahoma Girls Basketball Coaches Hall of Fame in 1988. Most everyone knows he coached the 1965 Cowgirl squad that won the Class B state championship – the only state title in school history. He coached the Cowgirls for a total of 13 seasons.

He coached the Cowboy basketball team for 15 seasons and took the 1962 squad to the state tournament – one of only two boys’ teams to advance into the state tournament.

Mr. West’s contributions to the football program are more notable than most people might think. He coached football on three different occasions – in 1958, 1962-1963 and 1977-1980. The 1962 squad just missed out on a district title and finished 8-2 which tied the 1929 football team for the second most wins in a season up to that time.

 It is likely that one of the key decisions made by Mr. West while serving as principal and head football coach at Ryan was moving from 11-man football to eight-man football following the 1977 season. The decision probably saved the football program and he coached the Cowboys to the playoffs in the first year of eight-man football.

Mr. West also coached baseball in the early years at Ryan.

In the four sports coached by Mr. West, he led squads to 14 conference championships, three county championships, seven bi-county championships, 10 district titles, three regional crowns and one state championship.

No tribute, however, would be complete without personal stories because Mr. West had a profound impact on my life.

Late during my eighth-grade year and Mr. West’s first year back at Ryan after having coached at Burkburnett, Texas and Duncan, he noticed right away that my athletic genes were just about non-existent.

Mr. West came to me and asked me if I would be interested in being the student trainer, which I did after football season that year. He sent me that following summer by bus to Baylor University to attend the National Athletic Trainers Association annual convention.

I was definitely way out of my league (can you imagine a kid who just completed eighth grade going on a trip like that alone?), but I learned a few things and spent the rest of my high school days helping with all sports. Mr. West saw potential in me that I did not see in myself and giving me that responsibility helped me stay connected to sports.

As you can imagine we spent a lot of time together during basketball practices. During that time I learned a lot about basketball, but did not fail to pick up one or two life lessons along the way.

One of those came one afternoon after Ryan had suffered a loss in a game that was not well-officiated. And, as I have a tendency to do even today, I was griping about how poorly the officials called the game the night before.

I suppose Mr. West had heard enough and he looked at me and said, “You worry about the things you have control over. We have no control over the officiating.”

That little tidbit has remained with me through the years and has been invaluable in my life’s journey.

In the years following whenever I would make my way to Ryan I would try to make sure I came in contact with Mr. West.

A side note – most anyone coached by Mr. West were all afraid to ever call him anything but Mr. West or Coach West. It was always difficult to address him as “Raymon.” But, that is the kind of respect he commanded and deserved.

Many others and in particular his family could share similar stories about how Mr. West impacted their lives. I am just fortunate I had the opportunity to be the one to write this article.

I believe it is pretty easy to come to one conclusion – there will never be another Raymon West.

Cameron University to present Disability Awareness Fair

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Cameron University will present the 11th Annual Disability Awareness Fair on Thursday, October 4, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the McCasland Ballroom, located in the McMahon Centennial Complex on the Cameron campus. The event is open to the public at no charge. The Disability Awareness fair will inform participants about services and resources available on campus and in the community for persons with disabilities.

 

The Disability Awareness fair will feature interactive stations where participants can learn more about disabilities such as visual impairments or learning disabilities in reading comprehension. In addition, various community organizations that provide services and support to those with disabilities will be present to share information and answer questions.  Cameron’s annual disability awareness event is an opportunity for students, faculty, staff and members of the community to gain an understanding of what it means to live with a disability.

 

For more information, contact the Office of Student Development at 580-581-2209 or via email at student_development@cameron.edu.

FCCLA Helps with Regional Food Bank

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Twenty-five members of Waurika FCCLA traveled to Oklahoma City on September 28 to volunteer at the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma.  The group was assigned to pack food items for the Back for Kids program.  While there, they packaged over 600 bags, or over 2,000 pounds of food.  Waurika Public Schools benefits from the Back Pack for Kids program.  The students said they enjoyed volunteering and knowing that their efforts will benefit Waurika school children.

Waurika Snake Hunt April 12 – April 15

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The Annual Waurika Rattlesnake Hunt will kick off on April 12th through April 15th. 

Thurs., April 12th- Armbands $20 each from 6:00 pm to 10:00 pm. Bring one can good per Armband and receive $5 off. (Thurs. only)

Fri., April 13th- Armbands $20 each 6:00 pm to 10:00 pm, There will also be a live band from 6:45-10:00.

Sat., April 14th- tickets will be sold

Sun., April 15th- Armbands $20 each 11:00 am to 4:00 pm

You may also purchase tickets for the carnival rides on Friday before Armbands go on sale at 6:00 pm. The rides will be open.

Sat., April 14th- sacking contest starts at 4:00 and there will be a live band from 6:45-10:00

Sun., April 15th- The king and queen contest will start at 3:00 and the sacking contest will start shortly after that. 

The Snake Handlers will have shows Friday- Sunday.

There will be a caravan Friday at 1:00, Saturday at 11:00, 2:00 and Sunday at 12:00. 

Contestants for this years Mr. and Mrs. Rattlesnake Hunt:

Blaikley Taylor – age 3

Landon Perry – age 5

Jason Chumley – age 5

Aspen Fox – age 5

J.T. chumley – age  7

Kaitlyn Cast – age 7

Sage Mayfield – age 9

Roxy Cathey – age 10

Annalynn Lewis – age 11

Please support our kiddos by purchasing a $1 chance to win $500 cash. 

Crowning will take place Sunday afternoon. 

If you have not signed up to run, and your child is not listed, please make sure you have returned the application back to Ashley Taylor or drop it off at the Waurika Fire Depot. 

Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anoatubby released the following statement on the passing of Senator John McCain.

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“Senator John McCain epitomized courage, conviction and commitment in his service to the people of the United States and citizens of Tribal nations across the country. His passion and unflinching honesty were hallmarks of his decades of service. His long tenure on the Senate Indian Affairs Committee and his support for tribal sovereignty, self-governance and self-determination will have a positive impact on federal Indian policy for generations to come. This is a time of great sadness for our entire nation, but we would be remiss not to express our condolences to the family and close friends of Senator John McCain who will miss him most.”

Bill Anoatubby, Governor,

The Chickasaw Nation

Cowboys Set to Battle Snyder for Season Opener

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The 99th season of high school football at Ryan is slated to begin tomorrow night (Friday) when the Snyder Cyclones invade the Bob Givens Sports Complex.

 Kickoff for the season opener for both teams is set for 7:30 p.m.

 This will be the earliest season opener in school history as the contest is part of Zero Week in high school football in Oklahoma.

 Teams can elect to start the season one week early and forego a second scrimmage date. The advantage is teams that play during Zero Week will have a week off during the regular season.

 Snyder ended the Cowboys’ season a year ago at Ryan as the Cyclones took advantage of numerous Ryan turnovers to post a 38-8 victory.

It was the first year returning to the playoffs for Ryan after a two-year absence and the Cowboys of first-year head coach Tony Tomberlin are looking to improve on last season’s 6-5 record.

Tomberlin will be taking over for long-time head coach Stan Mueggenborg after serving as an assistant for the veteran coach the past 12 years.

The outlook for the Cowboys for 2018 is guarded. The coaching staff faces the tall task of replacing six of eight starters on the defensive side of the ball.

 However, quarterback Grayson Tomberlin returns for his sophomore campaign after starting all 11 games a year ago as a freshman.

Joining Tomberlin, last season’s district newcomer of the year, in the backfield will be talented senior and all-district running back Skyler Parkhill.

Both players will give Ryan a solid nucleus from which to build on offense.

Tomberlin finished last season with 638 yards rushing and 12 touchdowns. He also threw for 731 yards on 44 completions and 12 touchdown passes.

Parkhill was the second leading rusher last season with 620 yards on 93 carries and five rushing touchdowns.

The Cowboys will feature a freshman in the backfield with Caleb Ferrin expected to start at the other running back position.

Kalen Weldon will return at one end for the Cowboys and Andrew Villerreal will move from the backfield to the other end position.

Two seniors, Sam Brown and Justin Williams, along with sophomore Trey Bryant will be counted on to try to open up running lanes for the backs and give Tomberlin time to find receivers.

The Cowboys will feature a bit more wide-open attack with more spread offense and implementing the pistol formation.

 Defensively, things are a bit unsettled. Not only will there be six new starters, but coming out of last week’s scrimmage, there are still some battles going on for starting positions.

Pacen Wiest and Bryant are battling for a starting role at nose guard and the defensive end positions are still up for grabs in the 3-2 defense.

The defense will need to mature quickly as Snyder, the Cowboys’ first opponent, will bring a potent offensive attack that will feature one of the state’s top sprinters in Trevor Evans. He was the state champion in Class A in the 400 meters and the runner up in the 100 meters last spring.

“I would say at this point the offense is a step ahead of the defense,” Tomberlin noted heading into this week’s final few days of practice.

“On defense we are still trying to figure some things out,” Tomberlin said.

Tomberlin was not particularly pleased with the Cowboys’ scrimmage with Maud last week.

 “We have a lot of improving to do, but we will watch film and we will get better,” said Tomberlin.

 “We are looking forward to some things and we are trying to get some excitement back in the program. The kids’ attitudes are good and we are lifting every day and they are getting stronger,” Tomberlin added.

Snyder will provide a tough challenge for the Cowboys’ season opener. The Cyclones are picked fourth District B-3, but ahead of them are Carnegie, Alex and Cyril – all top 15 teams in the preseason.

 Tomberlin will be assisted by first-year coach Austin Masoner.

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