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Sunday, March 24, 2019

Waurika Senior Michael Bryant Leaving His Mark on the Community

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Michael Bryant Jr

He can solve a Rubik’s Cube in about a minute, hit a pop-fly to center field, and this coming fall he will be playing on the field at Oklahoma State University as a member of the Cowboy marching band. 

Although he was born in Houston, Texas, Michael Bryant, Jr. has attended school here in Waurika his whole life.

He has participated in band, football, baseball, the academic team, FFA, the Beta Club, and is a member of the National Honor Society. 

So why did he try out for the OSU marching band? It’s not because one of his favorite colors is orange.

The simple answer is that he has a deep love for music. Two of his favorite genres is country and classic rock from the vinyl era. 

Although he can play the tuba, he favors the trumpet because of its versatility. 

Bryant tried out for a place in the marching band back in February and was informed the day of the try out that he had been accepted. 

He will attend band camp a week before the official move-in date in order to prepare for the marching season. 

He says his most memorable moments while attending Waurika High School are the times he competed with the band at state competitions. 

Even though he has many accolades and achievements under his belt, some of the qualities he possesses that makes him memorable among members of the community is his genuineness, maturity, and ability to communicate with people from all levels of society. 

His plans are to major in Agriculture and possibly go on to become a Veterinarian.   

Whatever he chooses to do in life he will go far. 

Cameron University alumnus Hon. Emmit Tayloe to address Class of 2018

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The Hon. Emmit Tayloe, a Cameron University alumnus and judge for Oklahoma’s Fifth Judicial District, will deliver the commencement address to Cameron’s Class of 2018. The annual graduation ceremony is slated for Friday, May 4 at 7:30 p.m. at Cameron Stadium. Following Tayloe’s address, CU’s 2018 graduates will receive their diplomas. A fireworks display will cap off the occasion. The public is invited to attend free of charge. No tickets are required.

“Throughout his professional life, Judge Emmit Tayloe has demonstrated integrity, character, and a genuine sense of caring about the Lawton/Fort Sill community,” says Cameron President John McArthur. “He is an outstanding role model for this year’s Cameron graduates, who can find inspiration in his dedication and service to others.”

Since earning a Bachelor of Arts degree from Cameron University in 1980, Lawton native Emmit Tayloe has experienced a career that has seen him open a private law practice, serve as an assistant district attorney and, since April 2014, hold the position of judge for Oklahoma’s Fifth Judicial District.  During each phase of his career, he has demonstrated care, enthusiasm, diligence and fairness.

Attending Cameron on a debate scholarship, Tayloe majored in speech and was a member of CU’s National Championship Speech Team in 1979.  He also served fellow students as vice president of the university’s Student Government Association.

Admitted to the bar in 1983 after earning his juris doctorate from the University of Oklahoma, Tayloe was appointed as a Comanche County assistant district attorney. In 1986, he opened a private practice in Lawton, where he specialized in both civil and criminal law. After his appointment to the Fifth Judicial District, Tayloe served as chief judge in 2016 and 2017 and as community sentencing judge since 2016.  He also initiated the Community Sentencing Diversion Program in 2016, which has been used by more than 100 defendants to date.

Professionally, Tayloe is an active member of the Oklahoma Bar Association and the Comanche County Bar Association, where he has served as president and vice president. He is a Fellow of the Oklahoma Bar Foundation. He has been actively involved in Comanche County’s Teen Court for more than 20 years as past chairman of its board of directors and as presiding judge.

Tayloe serves on the Preserving the Record task force, a statewide effort to address the current shortage of court reporters, and he was responsible for obtaining funding from the Oklahoma Bar Foundation to install video systems in all seven courtrooms in the Comanche County Courthouse, as well as the adult and juvenile detention centers. He also serves on the Executive Board for the Judicial Conference with the Chief and Vice-Chief of the Oklahoma Supreme Court.

He has continued his involvement with Cameron University, acting as judge for the Business Department’s annual Ethics Bowl competition.  In 2016, he was honored as one of Cameron’s Distinguished Alumni. He currently serves on the board of directors for the Cameron University Alumni Association.

A fourth generation Oklahoman, Tayloe has ties to Fort Sill, where his father retired as a Master Sergeant. He is active in the Kiwanis Club and served as a deacon and elder in his church.  Tayloe and his wife of more than 30 years, Dolina, have three children and four grandchildren.

Cameron University to present Disability Awareness Fair

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Cameron University will present the 11th Annual Disability Awareness Fair on Thursday, October 4, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the McCasland Ballroom, located in the McMahon Centennial Complex on the Cameron campus. The event is open to the public at no charge. The Disability Awareness fair will inform participants about services and resources available on campus and in the community for persons with disabilities.

 

The Disability Awareness fair will feature interactive stations where participants can learn more about disabilities such as visual impairments or learning disabilities in reading comprehension. In addition, various community organizations that provide services and support to those with disabilities will be present to share information and answer questions.  Cameron’s annual disability awareness event is an opportunity for students, faculty, staff and members of the community to gain an understanding of what it means to live with a disability.

 

For more information, contact the Office of Student Development at 580-581-2209 or via email at student_development@cameron.edu.

Beating the Odds

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By Lauren Hobbs

He has been beating the odds his entire life.

When his mother Tracy Woods was 6 months pregnant with him it was discovered that he  had one kidney larger than the other which led to a birth defect.

After many test he had surgery a month before he was 2 years old to fix his kidneys.

At the age of 3 his mother noticed he was not hitting the developmental milestones he was supposed to.

He was tested for autism and was diagnosed with pervasive development delay with autistic tendencies.

The doctor’s said they were not sure if he would ever be able to speak.

Click the above ad to visit Terri’s Facebook page!

Braden started headstart at age three.

While he was in Kindergarten he had the good fortune to be taught by Jeri Donn McCauley.

Tracy still get’s tears in her eyes when she talks about McCauley.

McCauley was like a God-Send. She would never give up on Brandon and continued to push him to do better.

Woods continued to improve.

Through his elementary school years he was winning school competitions and science fairs.

In his freshman year be began to really shine.

He was the new comer of the year on the academic team.

He placed 5th in the USAO interscholastic in Oklahoma History.

He placed 4th in American History at the Cameron interscholastic meet.

In his sophomore he place 1st in American History at the Cameron interscholastic meet which qualified to attend the tournament of champs in Oklahoma City where he tied for 3rd place.

Also during his sophomore year he qualified for the National Honor Society.

His junior year he was a member of the Beta Club, and he was the 3rd runner up for Mr. and Mrs. WHS.

Woods senior year has been productive and rewarding as well.

He has been named an ambassador for the Red River VoTech, which allowed him to give tours to prospective students.

He was also named to the National Technical Honor Society through the Red River Vo-Tech.

Woods was the runner up in Social Studies at the Beta Club Convention in Norman.

He earned an “Excellent” rating at the Oklahoma Scholastic Media Online Critique column.

On top of all of that he made honorable mention at the All State Academic Bowl.

He also scored a 30 on his ACT.

Woods participated in the Sooner Discovery program.

Woods has been accepted to attend Oklahoma University this coming fall where he has been awarded a $10,000.00 tuition waiver.

While attending OU, he may also try out for the band.

When Woods graduates at the end of this semester he will be recognized as an Eagle Scholar.

Braden Woods continued so defy the odds and overcome them, it only stands to reason that he will continue to do so in the future.

We wish him continued success as he advances with his life.

FCCLA Helps with Regional Food Bank

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Twenty-five members of Waurika FCCLA traveled to Oklahoma City on September 28 to volunteer at the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma.  The group was assigned to pack food items for the Back for Kids program.  While there, they packaged over 600 bags, or over 2,000 pounds of food.  Waurika Public Schools benefits from the Back Pack for Kids program.  The students said they enjoyed volunteering and knowing that their efforts will benefit Waurika school children.

Impact of Ryan’s Coach West Goes Far Beyond Athletic Circles

 You might expect when a sports writer is asked to write a tribute to someone the focus would be on that person’s accomplishments as a coach or player.

 But, this article will be focused more on the person than his accomplishments.

Last week a large crowd gathered at Ryan’s First Baptist Church to say goodbye to legendary Ryan coach and principal, Raymon West.

Most anyone that has been under the instruction of Mr. West would probably choose to focus on the man because   

his contribution to the lives of people went far beyond the football field, basketball court or baseball diamond if they were tasked with writing a tribute.

As Bro. Mark Kunkel, pastor of the First Baptist Church of Terral, said numerous times while conducting the service, everyone was mostly there to honor the man Mr. West and not Coach West.

However, well over half the crowd identified themselves at one point in the service as having been coached by Coach West.

And certainly his coaching ability is not to be overlooked, but each person who has come under the influence of Mr. West would probably be quick to agree with Bro. Kunkel and this writer that his greatest achievements were what he poured into our lives.

You see the goal of Mr. West was not really to produce great athletes – although that did happen. His goal was to prepare high school students for life.

And, for the most part he was a master at teaching life lessons.

Mr. West was tough. He was a disciplinarian. However, he correctly knew that making life a bit difficult in the athletic arena would serve each person well when they began to tackle life as a young adult.

And, some of those lessons not only served us well as young adults, but throughout our life time.

As was noted in the funeral service, Mr. West cared deeply for people. He endeared himself to most every athlete he ever coached and those he taught.

The compassion Mr. West had for people carried over to his retirement years as he served people through his church and was frequently present when a need had to be met in the community.

Everything Mr. West did was with great passion – his family, ranching, teaching and coaching.

Mr. West’s accomplishments in the coaching profession should not go without mention. He was inducted into the Oklahoma Girls Basketball Coaches Hall of Fame in 1988. Most everyone knows he coached the 1965 Cowgirl squad that won the Class B state championship – the only state title in school history. He coached the Cowgirls for a total of 13 seasons.

He coached the Cowboy basketball team for 15 seasons and took the 1962 squad to the state tournament – one of only two boys’ teams to advance into the state tournament.

Mr. West’s contributions to the football program are more notable than most people might think. He coached football on three different occasions – in 1958, 1962-1963 and 1977-1980. The 1962 squad just missed out on a district title and finished 8-2 which tied the 1929 football team for the second most wins in a season up to that time.

 It is likely that one of the key decisions made by Mr. West while serving as principal and head football coach at Ryan was moving from 11-man football to eight-man football following the 1977 season. The decision probably saved the football program and he coached the Cowboys to the playoffs in the first year of eight-man football.

Mr. West also coached baseball in the early years at Ryan.

In the four sports coached by Mr. West, he led squads to 14 conference championships, three county championships, seven bi-county championships, 10 district titles, three regional crowns and one state championship.

No tribute, however, would be complete without personal stories because Mr. West had a profound impact on my life.

Late during my eighth-grade year and Mr. West’s first year back at Ryan after having coached at Burkburnett, Texas and Duncan, he noticed right away that my athletic genes were just about non-existent.

Mr. West came to me and asked me if I would be interested in being the student trainer, which I did after football season that year. He sent me that following summer by bus to Baylor University to attend the National Athletic Trainers Association annual convention.

I was definitely way out of my league (can you imagine a kid who just completed eighth grade going on a trip like that alone?), but I learned a few things and spent the rest of my high school days helping with all sports. Mr. West saw potential in me that I did not see in myself and giving me that responsibility helped me stay connected to sports.

As you can imagine we spent a lot of time together during basketball practices. During that time I learned a lot about basketball, but did not fail to pick up one or two life lessons along the way.

One of those came one afternoon after Ryan had suffered a loss in a game that was not well-officiated. And, as I have a tendency to do even today, I was griping about how poorly the officials called the game the night before.

I suppose Mr. West had heard enough and he looked at me and said, “You worry about the things you have control over. We have no control over the officiating.”

That little tidbit has remained with me through the years and has been invaluable in my life’s journey.

In the years following whenever I would make my way to Ryan I would try to make sure I came in contact with Mr. West.

A side note – most anyone coached by Mr. West were all afraid to ever call him anything but Mr. West or Coach West. It was always difficult to address him as “Raymon.” But, that is the kind of respect he commanded and deserved.

Many others and in particular his family could share similar stories about how Mr. West impacted their lives. I am just fortunate I had the opportunity to be the one to write this article.

I believe it is pretty easy to come to one conclusion – there will never be another Raymon West.

Cody Simmons Reflects on the Transition from Principal to Superintendent

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Although he began his student teaching in Waurika back in 2004, his history with Waurika schools goes back further than that. 

His family have deep roots in Jefferson County. 

After beginning his student teaching, he was hired soon thereafter in January of 2005 as the second grade teacher at the Elementary. 

For the past eight years he has served as the Elementary Principal. 

By now, everyone is probably aware that Cody Simmons is the new Waurika Public Schools Superintendent beginning July of this year. 

Over the past couple of weeks the reality of the role has sunk in. 

He says he has been getting more familiar with the high school.

Cody said he recently met with the high school principal and the athletic director. 

He is becoming more familiar with the high school.

The adjustment for him will be managing the overall school system rather than just the Elementary. 

He says he is looking forward to the new experience. 

Simmons says that one of his expectations for the upcoming year is to close the gap between the Elementary and the High School. 

He would like to see the school system be more of a whole than separate parts (Elementary, Middle School, and High School).

During his time as principal, the Elementary has achieved “Blue Ribbon” status. 

That status is determined by the test scores over three consecutive years. 

Simmons is a busy man.

 

Besides being a full time school administrator, he also enjoys mowing yards, working out, and most of all spending time with his family. 

He says right now they are enjoying ball games several nights per week. 

Simmons is also deeply involved in the community.

He was instrumental in the establishment of the Veterans Park downtown. 

He is quick to give credit to others who have assisted in the success of the park. 

Craig Williams, he says was gracious to add his professional touch to the landscaping. 

Simmons also attributes the success of the Elementary, including its “Blue Ribbon” status, to the hard work and dedication of the teachers. 

“I feel like the teachers here are all high quality enthusiastic professional teachers. Whenever you surround yourself with [people like ] that good things will happen,” Simmons says .

Chickasaw weapons-maker to Hollywood authors book

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TISHOMINGO, Okla. – Historically accurate craftsmanship of Native American weapons has made Chickasaw citizen Eric Smith recognized among Hollywood movie-makers.

In December, he will add another accomplishment to his resumé – published author.

“The Warriors tools: Plains Indian bows, arrows and quivers” will hit bookstores and retail businesses Dec. 4. It is published by Roadrunner Press.

“I am very excited about it. Roadrunner Press is out of Oklahoma City and has published many Native American-themed books,” Smith said. “It is written from a Native American perspective. So many books concerning (Native American) history are written by Europeans and they had a completely different perspective from that of Native people,” he added.

Smith most recently found nationwide acclaim for crafting Native weaponry for the Oscar-winning movie “The Revenant.” The 2016 motion picture was nominated for a dozen Oscars, taking home three; Best Actor, Best Cinematography and Best Director.

He is still crafting weapons for movies but is unable to say much about his endeavors until studios and movie executives are ready to make announcements.

For Children

The book is written at a high school level and Smith’s greatest desire is to make it available to students. Children are the keys to preserving Native culture, in Smith’s opinion.

“The things that we do, our cultural ways, they must continue. The key to that is reaching children. We must inspire our youth or we are in trouble,” Smith intoned, adding “with everything I do, I try to inspire our younger generations to take up some of these techniques.”

“As a youth, when I was learning to make Native weapons, people were telling me ‘this is irrelevant’ and ‘there is no use for these things in the modern world.’ Well, I am a walking testament that isn’t true. Here are these ancient methods so needed and highly sought after today,” Smith said. “That just shows the relevance of our people and our culture.”

He has been crafting Native weapons since age nine. That is when he made his first bow. “No, it wasn’t a very good one,” Smith recalls with a sly grin, “but I was so proud because it actually worked.” By the time Smith entered his teens, his craft was honed to such a high degree he was asked to make bows for friends and for hunters.

The Next Level

Making weapons came naturally to Smith, but a curiosity nagged his soul. Not only did he wish to make quality weapons, but he also wanted them to be historically and culturally pure.

For guidance, he turned to Native elders and made frequent road trips to consult with them.

“Elders always have a story to tell. If you sit down with an elder, listen and let them talk to you, it is amazing the information they will share. Everywhere I went, whether it was Pine Ridge (South Dakota Oglala Lakota) or Tuba City in the Navajo Nation, I listened and learned.”

With the visits came an epiphany – all ancient cultures worldwide used archery.

No culture, however, excelled at it like Native Americans.

In the book, Smith devotes two chapters to weapons made from the horns/antlers and sinew of animals. “Native Americans made some of the most complex bows in the history of the world,” Native American “horn bows” are among them.

“Mountain sheep horns, elk antlers, caribou antlers, and sinew were all used. I’ve replicated many of those bows. For me, it was a lot of trial and error and a lot of mistakes. For our people to figure out this complicated technology, it is almost unbelievable,” Smith explained. “It shows great skill, great ingenuity, and dedication to work with material available to them in their natural environment. So, I share that knowledge in the book for people who want to try to do it.”

Winning the Battle

Smith is an expert in Native American weaponry. He has successfully replicated all kinds of weapons from many different tribes, including his own tribe. However, his specialty is weapons of Plains Indians at around the time they acquired horses. Most historians put the date at around 1680, following the Pueblo Revolt.

He was recently a trifecta winner at the Southeastern Art Show and Market (SEASAM) sponsored by the Chickasaw Nation during its Annual Meeting and Festival celebration. Smith entered two categories and placed three times – first place in cultural clothing; second place in weaponry and third place in cultural clothing.

Sometime in the near future, he will move from his Lawton home to Pauls Valley. He has spent a year restoring a home once owned by a family member who is now deceased.

Sharing his knowledge, research, philosophy, and skills appeal to Smith because the book “will be around forever.”

Eric Smith greets visitors from his booth at the Southeastern Art Show and Market during the 2018 Chickasaw Nation Annual Meeting and Festival.

“It took about four months to write the book,” he said. “I did some research to make sure all the facts were correct, but primarily I wrote about what I have learned from elders and by doing it. I had friends read the manuscript and they said ‘it makes me want to build a bow,’” he said. “And, I consider that a great compliment.”

“The Warriors tools: Plains Indian bows, arrows, and quivers” will be available on Amazon, Barnes and Noble and other major bookstores. Amazon will make the book available for Kindle download.

Terral News and Happenings

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QUOTE OF THE DAY – “The meaning of life is to find your gift.  The purpose of life is to give it away.” Pablo Picasso.

I would like to take the time to say “Thanks” for all the prayers, cards, and phone calls while I was home after back surgery.  “Thank You” to Sue McKinley for doing my office duties while I was out of the office.  A special “Thanks” to Mary Alice Kunkel for teaching my GA Class on Wednesday nights at the church.  GA’s your notes and drawings were so very uplifting and I really enjoyed them.  While I am not 100% as of yet, I am on the road to recovery.  I could not have done this without my best friend and partner in life, my husband, Valton Gambill.  I want you to know how much I appreciate everything you have done for me.  Thank you all – Shirley Gambill.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH GA’s -Thanks to all who came out on Saturday and supported our Bingo and fundraising efforts.

If you missed it, you will have a second chance on Dec. 1 to play Bingo again at 3:00 p.m. Come and join us!

TERRAL SCHOOL EVENTS – Thanksgiving Break will be Nov. 19-23.  School resumes on Nov. 26th. Nov. 26 we will have a game at Wichita Falls Christian at 4:00 p.m. there.

TERRAL VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT – The Terral Volunteer Fire Department is having a Toy and Food Drive for Christmas.  Donation boxes are located at the Terral City Hall.  The Drive will begin on November 1st through Dec. 15th. 

All donations will be given to those in need in Terral at Christmastime.  For more information, you may call  580-437-2337.

CRAFT SHOW & BINGO – The FBC Girls in Action will be holding a Craft Show and Bingo on Saturday, December 1, 2018, at the Terral Community Center.  The Craft Show will be from 9:00 to 2:00 p.m. Come on out and select some unique gifts for Christmas.  Gift Wrapping will be available.  Bingo will start at 3:00 p.m. Tables will reserve for $10.00 each.  If you would like to reserve a table call Shirley at 437-2337 or 437i-2545 after 5:00 p.m. All proceeds go to the FBC Girls in Action for activities, crafts, and outings for the group.  Hope to see ya there!

COMMUNITY PRAYER LIST – A.R. and Martha Jane Goates, Wayne Wyler, Amy Alsup, Pat Bussey, Tony Rodriguez, Carried Villarreal, Brenda Bryant, Archie Fulton, Scotty Daly, Tom Baysinger, Sue Linton, Martin Villarreal, Sr., Joe Martin, Adam White, Mary Loo Duke, Esther Grimes, Virginia Tanner, Darlene Hall, T.K. Delaney, Manuel Villarreal, Shawna Reed, Hardy Johnson, and our military stationed around the world.  May God Keep you in His loving care.

Oklahoma College Savings Plan offers gift kids won’t outgrow

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OKLAHOMA CITY – As holiday shopping gets underway, State Treasurer Ken Miller is encouraging Oklahoma parents and grandparents to consider a gift that kids won’t outgrow—contributions to an Oklahoma 529 College Savings Plan account.

To make that gift even more attractive, the Oklahoma College Savings Plan (OCSP) is offering a special bonus promotion from Black Friday through Cyber Monday. New accounts opened Nov. 23-26 and set up for automatic contributions will receive a bonus $50 from OCSP. For details, visitwww.ok4saving.org/offer.

Miller, board chair for OCSP, said the benefits of college savings last for years to come.

“Kids will outgrow clothes and lose interest in even the trendiest toy, but the benefits of higher education will last for the rest of their lives,” Miller said. “Setting aside even small amounts regularly over time can make a big difference when it’s time to attend college.”

Miller said OCSP contributions are a gift that children will appreciate more as they get older.

“Taking even a portion of what you’re going to spend on gifts this year and putting it in an OCSP account is a worthwhile investment,” Miller said. “College graduates have more job opportunities and make more over their lifetimes, so OCSP contributions, and the educations they help pay for, really are the gifts that keep on giving.”

Parents, grandparents, relatives or friends who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents and at least 18 years old may open an OCSP account on behalf of a beneficiary, and the minimum initial contribution is only $100. Once an account is open, anyone can contribute, making an OCSP account a great gift idea for all family and friends.

The $50 bonus contribution for new accounts will be deposited after six months of automatic contributions.

The OCSP website, ok4saving.org, provides gift-givers with an eGifting option where contributions can be made to an OCSP account online, and “Gift of Education” certificates can be created to show the contribution to a loved one’s account.

For those hoping family and friends will contribute to an existing plan, OCSP has created an option to allow account owners to send a tactful, prewritten email inviting others to contribute to their existing OCSP account.

Through September 2018, more than $961,000 has been contributed through the OCSP eGifting program, representing more than 1,000 gifts. Last year, 39 percent of all eGifted dollars were received in November and December.

“The eGifting program gives an extended family the opportunity to contribute to college savings,” Miller said. “Grandparents, aunts, uncles and anyone else can help their loved ones reach their college savings goals.”

More information about opening an OCSP account can be found at www.ok4saving.org.

 

About the OCSP

Introduced in April 2000, the Oklahoma 529 College Saving Plan (OCSP) is Oklahoma’s direct-sold 529 college savings plan. It is designed for families who want to direct their own 529 college savings accounts. The plan is managed by TIAA-CREF Tuition Financing, Inc. Introduced in March 2009, OklahomaDream 529 Plan is offered through financial advisors and is managed by Allianz Global Investors.  As of September 30, 2018, combined assets in both plans exceeded $1 billion.

Oklahoma taxpayers may deduct, from their Oklahoma adjusted gross income, up to $10,000 in contributions to the Oklahoma 529 College Savings Plan for individual taxpayers and up to $20,000 for taxpayers filing a joint return with a five-year carryforward. Read the Disclosure Booklet carefully.

 Consider the investment objectives, risks, charges, and expenses before investing in the Oklahoma College Savings Plan. Please visit www.ok4saving.org or call toll-free 1-877-654-7284 for a Plan Disclosure Booklet containing this and more information. Read it carefully.

 Check with your home state to learn if it offers tax or other benefits such as financial aid, scholarships and protection from creditors for investing in its own 529 plan.  Investments in the Plan are neither insured nor guaranteed and there is the risk of investment loss.

 Consult your legal or tax professional for tax advice, including the impact of the new federal tax changes. If the funds aren’t used for qualified higher education expenses, a 10% penalty tax on earnings (as well as federal and state income taxes) may apply.     

 Funding for OCSP prizes comes from the marketing budget of the Oklahoma 529 College Savings Plan; no state funds are used.

 TIAA-CREF Tuition Financing, Inc., Program Manager. TIAA-CREF Individual & Institutional Services, LLC, Member FINRA and SIPC, distributor, and underwriter for the Oklahoma College Savings Plan.

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