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Sunday, January 20, 2019

Waurika Band Qualifies for State Again

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The Waurika High School Band, under the direction of Everett Hodges, made a First Division Superior rating at the OSSAA District 8 Band Contest held last Wednesday, February 28th.  The contest was held at Duncan High School.  All three judges gave the band the highest rating possible.  The band qualifies for State Band contest to be held at East Central University in Ada on March 27th.

The 62-member group played 2 selections, Majestica and Pinnacle.  This marks the 2nd consecutive year and the 6th out of 7 years the band has qualified for state.  Hodges said, “I am really proud of this group. To start with, we lost 14 seniors last year.  Then we missed 4 days in the last month to flu and weather. They handled the adversity well and responded like we needed them to.”

The band also sight-read at that portion of the contest and made a 2 rating. Hodges continued, “There are 224 schools in Class 2A in Oklahoma.  Of those, some don’t have bands, but even at that, to be one of 10 or 12 schools that go to State on a regular basis makes me feel good about what we are doing.  It is fun to have success.”

ROY CLARK DIES AT 85

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TULSA, Okla.Roy Clark, the legendary ‘superpicker’, GRAMMY, CMA and ACM award winner, Country Music Hall of Fame and Grand Ole Opry member and co-host of the famed ‘Hee Haw’ television series, died today at the age of 85 due to complications from pneumonia at home in Tulsa, Okla.

Roy Clark’s decade-defying success could be summed up in one word — sincerity. Sure, he was one of the world’s finest multi-instrumentalists, and one of the first cross-over artists to land singles on both the pop and country charts. He was the pioneer who turned Branson, Mo., into the live music capital of the world (the Ozark town today boasts more seats than Broadway). And his talents turned Hee Haw into the longest-running syndicated show in television history.

But the bottom line for Roy Clark was the honest warmth he gave to his audiences. Bob Hope summed it up when he told Roy, “Your face is like a fireplace.”

“A TV camera goes right through your soul,” says the man who starred on Hee Haw for 24 years and was a frequent guest host for Johnny Carson on The Tonight Show. “If you’re a bad person, people pick that up. I’m a firm believer in smiles. I used to believe that everything had to be a belly laugh. But I’ve come to realize that a real sincere smile is mighty powerful.”

For a man who didn’t taste major success until he was 30, the key was not some grand plan but rather taking everything in its own time. “Sure,” he said, “I had dreams of being a star when I was 18. I could’ve pushed it too, but it wouldn’t have happened any sooner. I’m lucky. What’s happened has happened in spite of me.”

In fact, that’s what Clark titled his autobiography, My Life — In Spite of Myself! with Marc Elliot (Simon & Shuster, 1994). The book reminded many that there is much more to Roy Clark than fast fingers and a quick wit.

That he was raised in Washington, D.C., often surprises people. Born Roy Linwood Clark on April 15, 1933, in Meherrin, Virginia, his family moved to D.C. when he was a youngster. His father played in a square dance band and took him to free concerts by the National Symphony and by various military bands. “I was subjected to different kinds of music before I ever played. Dad said, ‘Never turn your ear off to music until your heart hears it–because then you might hear something you like.'”

Beginning on banjo and mandolin, he was one of those people “born with the music already in them.” His first guitar, a Sears Silvertone, came as a Christmas present when he was 14. That same year, 1947, he made his first TV appearance. He was 15 when he earned $2 for his first paid performance, with his dad’s band. In the fertile, diverse musical soil of cosmopolitan D.C., he began playing bars and dives on Friday and Saturday nights until he was playing every night and skipping school–eventually dropping out at 15. “Music was my salvation, the thing I loved most and did best. Whatever was fun, I’d go do that.”

The guitar wizard soon went on tour with country legends such as Hank Williams and Grandpa Jones. After winning a national banjo competition in 1950, he was invited to perform at the Grand Ole Opry, which led to shows with Red Foley and Ernest Tubb. Yet he’d always return to D.C. to play not only country but jazz, pop, and early rock’n’roll (he’s prominently featured in the recent book Capitol Rock); to play with black groups and white groups; to play fast, to even play guitar with his feet. In 1954, he joined Jimmy Dean and the Texas Wildcats, appearing in clubs and on radio and TV, and even backing up Elvis Presley.

But in 1960, he was 27 and still scrambling. An invitation to open for Wanda Jackson at the Golden Nugget in Las Vegas proved to be his big break. It led to his own tour, on the road for 345 straight nights at one stretch, and when he returned to Vegas in 1962, he came back as a headliner and recording star, with his debut album The Lightning Fingers Of Roy Clark. The next year, he had his first hit, The Tips Of My Fingers, a country song that featured an orchestra and string section. “We didn’t call it crossover then but I guess that’s what it was,” he says. “We didn’t aim for that, because if you aim for both sides you miss them both. But we just wanted to be believable.”

He was–on record and on TV, where his first appearances in 1963 on ‘The Tonight Show’ and ‘American Bandstand’ showcased his easygoing attitude and rural sense of humor. “Humor is a blessing to me. My earliest recollections are of looking at something and seeing the lighter side. But it’s always spontaneous. I couldn’t write a comedy skit for someone else.”

Throughout the ’60s, Clark recorded several albums, toured constantly, and appeared on TV variety shows from Carson to Mike Douglas to Flip Wilson. “I was the token bumpkin. It became, ‘Let’s get that Clark guy. He’s easy to get along with.'” Then came ‘Hee Haw.’ A countrified ‘Laugh-In’ with music, shot in Nashville, ‘Hee Haw’ premiered in 1969. Co-starring Clark and Buck Owens, it was an immediate hit. Though CBS canceled the show after two-and-a-half years, despite ranking in the Top 20, the series segued into syndication, where it remained until 1992. “I long ago realized it was not a figure of speech when people come up to me and say they grew up watching me since they were ‘that big’.”

A generation or two has also grown up listening to him. In 1969, Yesterday, When I Was Young charted Top 20 Pop and #9 Country (Billboard). Including Yesterday, Clark has had 23 Top 40 country hits, among them eight Top 10s: The Tips Of My Fingers (#10, 1963), I Never Picked Cotton (#5) and Thank God And Greyhound You’re Gone (#6, 1970), The Lawrence Welk-Hee Haw Counter Revolution Polka (#9, 1972), Come Live With Me (#1) and Somewhere Between Love And Tomorrow (#2, 1973), and If I Had It To Do All Over Again (#2, 1976). In addition, his 12-string guitar rendition of Malaguena is considered a classic and, in 1982, he won a Grammy (Best Country Instrumental Performance) for Alabama Jubilee.

A consummate musician, no matter the genre, he co-starred with Petula Clark at Caesar’s Palace, became the first country artist to headline at the Montreux International Jazz Festival and appeared in London on ‘The Tom Jones Show.’ Clark was amazed when guitarists from England credited his BBC specials and performances on variety TV shows with the likes of the Jackson 5 for inspiring them to play. But the highlight of his career, he said, was a pioneering, sold-out 1976 tour of the then-Soviet Union. “Even though they didn’t know the words, there were tears in their eyes when I played Yesterday. Folks there said we wouldn’t realize in our lifetime the good we’d accomplished, just because of our pickin’ around.”

When he returned in 1988 to now-Russia, Clark was hailed as a hero. Though he’d never bought a joke and doesn’t read music, the self-described, and proud of it, “hillbilly singer” was that rare entertainer with popularity worthy of a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and respect worthy of the Academy of Country Music’s Pioneer Award and membership in the Gibson (Guitar) Hall of Fame; an entertainer who could star in Las Vegas (the first country artist inducted into its Entertainers Hall of Fame), in Nashville (becoming the 63rd member of the Grand Ole Opry in 1987), and at Carnegie Hall. Roy was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2009.

Roy’s many good deeds on behalf of his fellow man led to him receiving the 1999 Minnie Pearl Humanitarian of the Year Award from TNN’s Music City News Awards. In October 2000, he was inducted into the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame, and he was actively involved with school children who attend the Roy Clark Elementary School in Tulsa, Okla.

From his home in Tulsa, where he moved in 1974 with Barbara, his wife of 61 years, Clark continued to tour extensively. For him — and for his legion of loyal fans — live performance was what it was all about. “Soon as you hit the edge of the stage and see people smiling and know they’re there to hear you, it’s time to have fun. I keep a band of great young people around me, and we’re not musically restrained. It’s not about ‘let’s do it correct’ but ‘let’s do it right.’”

At the end of each of Roy’s concerts, he would tell the audience, “We had to come, but you had a choice. Thanks for being here.” With responding smiles, audiences continued to thank Roy for being there, too.

Roy is preceded in death by his beloved grandson Elijah Clark who passed at the age of fourteen on September 24, 2018. Roy is survived by Barbara, his wife of sixty-one years, his sons Roy Clark II and wife Karen, Dr. Michael Meyer and wife Robin, Terry Lee Meyer, Susan Mosier and Diane Stewart, and his grandchildren: Brittany Meyer, Michael Meyer, Caleb Clark, Josiah Clark and his sister, Susan Coryell.

A memorial celebration will be held in the coming days in Tulsa, Okla., details forthcoming.

Chickasaw Nation Documentary Wins Heartland EMMY® Award

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“And Our Mothers Cried” Vividly Brings to Life Native American Experiences During the Indian Boarding School Era of the Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries

ADA, Okla. — The Heartland Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences honored “Winter Fire—And Our Mothers Cried,” with an EMMY® Award in the Documentary – Historical category.

“And Our Mothers Cried” vividly brings to life the Indian boarding school era of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. For several generations of Native American children, including some Chickasaws, attending boarding school meant separation from their families and indoctrination into a culture that wasn’t their own. The schools, which were guided by the infamous slogan, “Kill the Indian. Save the Man,” prohibited most students from speaking their own language and emphasized labor-intensive trades that would assimilate them into white culture through military-type institutions.

The documentary presents a stark contrast between these schools and schools established and operated by the Chickasaw Nation, which were designed to prepare Chickasaw children to compete in a rapidly changing world. “And Our Mothers Cried” presents compelling stories from some of the Chickasaw elders who lived through the boarding school era. Their experiences weave a complex story of sorrow and survival, but also one of hope and resilience from a time when tribal governments and culture were under attack.

“Winter Fire,” part of Chickasaw.tv’s original programming lineup, is a documentary series about Chickasaw history, culture, people and present-day tribal issues. Each episode documents the Chickasaw stories and oral histories that have been passed down through the generations about topics such as removal, the revitalization of the Chickasaw language, traditional medicine, and Indian boarding schools, as in the episode “And Our Mothers Cried.

“Our intention with Chickasaw.tv was to create a repository—a digital Smithsonian, if you will—to document our culture, legacy, and traditions for future generations,” said Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anoatubby. “We believe it is vital to tell the stories of the Chickasaw people and the role the Chickasaw Nation has played in history from our own point of view because we believe it adds important context to the historical narrative.”

Chickasaw.tv is a high-definition, a video-rich network focused on emphasizing the culture, legacy and continuing contributions of the Chickasaw people. Originally launched in 2010 under the leadership of Governor Anoatubby and relaunched in 2017 on a dynamic, new, multi-device platform, it is the first online video network of its kind by a Native American tribe. The interactive, high-quality content is available on mobile, tablets, desktop, Apple TV and Google Chromecast, with enhanced functionality and a user-friendly experience. The expanded original programming and the release of the Chickasaw.tv app on Apple TV and Google Chromecast reflect the Chickasaw Nation’s continued commitment to technological innovation and cultural preservation.

Click here to watch the EMMY® Award-winning “Winter Fire—And Our Mothers Cried.”

Senior Profile: Gatlin Black

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This will be Gatlin Black’s last year attending Waurika Schools. 

1. How do you feel about your last year?

“I’m going to miss it, but I’m ready to see the world.”

2. Sum up your school experience?

“It has been adventurous and unpredictable.”

3. What activities and organizations have you participated in?

“I’ve been involved in baseball, basketball, football, FFA, cross-country, student council, NHS, and the academic team.”

4. What are your plans for the future?

 “I plan on studying business.”

5. Favorite Memory at WHS?

“Definitely going undefeated and becoming district champs for my senior year.”

6. What teacher’s class has best prepared you for the future?

“Coach Jessie’s history class, he taught me to respect and wisdom. He also taught me to be ready for the real world.”

7. Give advice to underclassmen?

“Learn how to cheat early.”

8. Anyone you want to think?

“Family, friends, teachers, Rickey Bobby, and God.”

9. Do you have a fear about leaving? “No.”

10. Are you going to miss being at WHS?

“I will miss the good times and memories, but I’m ready to see the rest of the world.”

Waurika Cleanup Day is a Huge Success!

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To say that the first Cleanup day in Waurika was a huge success would be an understatement.

Jane Carter cleaning at Sorosis Park

Several volunteers arrived bringing lawnmowers, farm equipment, rakes, shovels, and leaf blowers.

By the end of the day this past Saturday, downtown Waurika, Sorosis Park, and Centennial Park, along with other areas were very much improved.

Craig Williams even sent some of his employees down to help in the process.

Thanks to everyone who helped in any way.

Michael Bryant Jr trimming the walking track within Centennial Park.
Charles Wadsworth drops off some limbs.
Melicia McFadden
Michael Bryant Sr. mowed Centennial Park.
Jacob Eck is taking down the Movie Theater sign downtown.
Jerry Wallace cleaned up the excess dirt on D Street and leveled the ground adjacent to the sidewalk on the north side of Centennial Park.
Colton Bryant trimming around the swing sets at the park.
Monica Bartling sweeping the sidewalk on D Street.
Bob Aldrige getting rid of the leaves with his leaf blower.
Houston Scott removing debris from the Centennial Park
Lauren Nitschke organized the First Christian Youth for the cleanup day.
Jim Schaffner loading up one of the trucks with limbs.
Heather Bryant picking up leaves and garbage at the park.
Pat Gaines used his chainsaw to trim back the trees.
Elizabeth Scott oiling up her shears for trimming.

Waurika Student Council Award Students With Noble Character Award

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Bosten Smith with Dalee Barrick

This week, the Waurika High School Student Council recognized their middle school and high school “Good Character Award” winners. The award is given to one middle school and one high school student monthly on account of their good behavior. This award was started by the Student Council Officers with the help of two teachers,

Magen Allen and Janell Rochell. One can be nominated by teachers, faculty, or their peers by sending in a letter to the student council

8th Grader Bosten Smith was chosen for the January award in the middle school division. Her nomination was sent in with a letter describing her as, “kind to everyone, helpful, and positive.” The student council believes Smith exemplifies everything the character award stands for!

Isaac Gholson with Dalee Barrick
Bosten Smith with Dalee Barrick

Freshman Isaac Gholson received the character award for the high school division. His letter was sent in from a teacher. In the letter, the teacher explained Isaac’s class was given the opportunity to write a letter to one of their classmates complimenting them in order to gain bonus points. Instead, he wrote a card to everyone in his class so no one would feel left out.

Waurika has gifted athletes, scholars, and more. But we also have kind, compassionate students. This award is meant to recognize that and applaud it.

Waurika Bands Perform at Fundraiser Sunday

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Waurika’s High School and Middle School bands performed at the Fiesta Fundraiser this past Sunday at the Waurika High School.

More performances from the Waurika Band Concert. (l-r) Regena Bradley, Hope Cummings, and Brooklyn Barnes Photo by Curtis Plant

After the delicious Mexican meal, honor band members were introduced and various members performed solos.

The solo artist were accompanied by Starr Herron and band director Everett Hodges.

2017-2018 SCOBDA Honor Band members

Riley Hobbs – 1st chair HS Baritone

Michael Bryant- 6th chair HS trumpet

Sara Tolle- 4th chair HS French horn

Trenton Helloms- 6th chair HS French Horn

Kaytlyn Williams- 4th chair JH Flute

Mallory Adkins- 11th chair JH Flute

Chloe Adkins- 7th chair JH trumpet

Hannah Lamons- 10th chair JH trumpet

Hope Cummings- 3rd chair JH clarinet

Regena Bradley- 7th chair JH clarinet

Brooklyn Barnes -12th chair JH clarinet

Kaylee Morris- 4th chair alto sax.

Michael Bryant Hired as New City Clerk and More Waurika City News

There were two big stories to come out of the May City Commissioner meeting for the city of Waurika.

The first was the hiring of former Jefferson County Sheriff Michael Bryant. He will bring administrative and law enforcement experience to the position which will be a plus as one of his duties will be city code enforcement.

Bryant is the longest serving sheriff in Jefferson County’s history. When he first took office as sheriff the department had just enough money to last 30 days and yet there were 90 days left in the fiscal year. When he left the department there was over $500,000.00 in the accounts.

He will begin his duties as city clerk on June 1st.

The other story of interest from Monday’s meeting was the recognition by the Oklahoma Water Resource Board for the city’s loan consolidation.

Charles de Coune, Leading Manager of the Financial Assistance Division of OWRB, presented the City Commissioners with a commemorative check symbolizing the $975,000.00 loan consolidation.

The loan will save the city 10 years of payments and over $240,000.00.

Other business included the hiring of Jeffrey Overton in the city’s Water Department. Scott spoke highly of him and said he is a willing and dedicated worker who will be an asset to the department. He is also willing to work in other departments when needed.

The city also began the process of closing an alley next to the Waurika Fire Department.

Purchase orders and claims for the City of Waurika was paid in the amount of $21,726.81.

The city will begin advising property owners near Lot 1 Block 26 of the Sycamore Addition in Waurika that Bobby Taylor is wanting to move a mobile home on the the premises.

The procedure will also be followed to notify property owners near 407 E. Iowa, Lots 15-18 of the Harper Addition in Waurika that Mary Harvey and Tyler Bowen want to move a manufactured home on the premises of 407 E. Iowa.

After the business for the city of Waurika was completed the commissioners entered the Waurika Public Works Authority meeting.

The council opened the 1 bid for the Waurika Golf Course from Michael Delaney. The commissioners voted to keep the bidding open for another 30 days. Delaney understood and said he just wants to keep the golf course open.

The commissioners approved the purchase of 12 new membranes for the Water Treatment Facility in the amount of $10,800.00. That’s around $300 less per membrane than they spent on a previous purchase.

Last but not least, the commissioners approved $39,456.54 in purchase orders and claims.

 

Cameron to Enjoy Spring Break

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Cameron University students will have the opportunity to take a hard-earned break from their academic pursuits as the University marks the midpoint of the semester with Spring Break from March 19-23. No classes will be held during this time, and administrative offices will be closed. Classes will resume and administrative offices will re-open for normal business hours on Monday, March 26.

Students who have need of library resources in order to prepare for class assignments that are due the week of March 26 are encouraged to plan ahead, as the Cameron Library will be closed from Monday, March 19 through Sunday, March 25.  Regular hours will resume on Monday, March 26.

Fitness buffs can still use the Aggie Rec Center during Spring Break. The facility will be open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday from 1 to 6 p.m. Normal operating hours will resume on Monday, March 26.

Make Plans to Attend the Terral Reunion This Weekend

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The biennial Terral All School Reunion will be held on Saturday, October 6, 2018, on the grounds of the Terral Community Center.  Registration will begin at 10:00 AM with lunch being served at 12:00 noon.  Note:  Class pictures will be taken at 11:00 AM again this year.  Be sure to tell everyone you see who is associated in any way with Terral School or Union Valley to come early and join us that day. 

Lunch will be catered again this year and you will need a reservation.  Reservations MUST be received no later than September 21, along with a check for $12.00 per meal.

Due to very generous donations the Terral Alumni Association was proud to award four $1,500 scholarships and one $529 scholarship in 2017, and four $2,500 scholarships in 2018.  The scholarships go to deserving persons who reside in the Terral school district, to assist them in continuing their education.  Selling brass nametags for the memorial plaques also assists in funding the scholarships.  The brass nametags are available for $20 and the plaques are permanently displayed in the Terral Community Center.

Please remember there is no membership fee charged to anyone.  The All School Reunion is funded every two years solely on the donations of people who love Terral School and want to enjoy the fellowship of visiting and remembering old times.

If you would like to contribute to the scholarship fund or assist with reunion expenses, you can include that on the registration form, even if you are unable to attend. 

We plan to tour Terral School again this year.  Raffle information is enclosed.      

We hope to see you on October 6th.

If you have questions or need additional information call or email:

Ronnie Ewing @ 940-928-2278 or ronnie.ewing@sbcglobal.net   

Karen Gunter @ 580-437-2347 or karengunter.1950@gmail.com 

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