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Sunday, January 20, 2019

Award-winning actor Gary Busey to speak to students at Oklahoma State

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(STILLWATER, Oklahoma, Nov. 8, 2018) — A familiar face is coming to Oklahoma State University. Broadcast in “America’s Brightest Orange” on the 6,000-square-foot video board during Cowboy football, Gary Busey’s screaming likeness has served as a distraction for opposing teams all season.

Now, the man himself is coming to campus. Busey, a prolific character actor since the 1970s, will speak to students at 11 a.m. Friday, Nov. 16 in the Student Union Theater. The event is free, but seating is limited.

Busey has a new book, Buseyisms: Gary Busey’s Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth. In it, he takes a word and gives it meaning, one letter a time. Love breaks down to “Living On Victorious Energy.” Change becomes “Creating Happiness And New Guiding Energy.” On his website, Busey said, “I have a hobby that’s really wonderful because it helps me understand the meaning of one word with a sentence.”

A book sale and signing will take place after his presentation.

Gary Busey, famous character actor, will speak to students at Oklahoma State University at 11 a.m., Friday, Nov. 16. Busey will be promoting his new book, Buseyisms: Gary Busey’s Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth.

Busey began his college career at OSU but left to pursue a career in entertainment. He has appeared in more than 150 films. He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor and won the National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actor for his portrayal of Buddy Holly in The Buddy Holly Story in 1978. Busey also had prominent supporting roles in Lethal Weapon, Predator 2, The Firm, Rookie of the Year and more.

On Dec. 4, 1988, Busey was in a near-fatal motorcycle accident when he was not wearing a helmet. As a result of a severe head injury, he was comatose for three months and had to relearn how to eat, walk and talk. After his recovery, he helped create the language for the Traumatic Brain Injury Act of 1996, signed into law by President Bill Clinton.

FCCLA Helps with Regional Food Bank

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Twenty-five members of Waurika FCCLA traveled to Oklahoma City on September 28 to volunteer at the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma.  The group was assigned to pack food items for the Back for Kids program.  While there, they packaged over 600 bags, or over 2,000 pounds of food.  Waurika Public Schools benefits from the Back Pack for Kids program.  The students said they enjoyed volunteering and knowing that their efforts will benefit Waurika school children.

The Artesian Hotel offers Classic Christmas Giveaway

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SULPHUR, OKLAHOMA (Oct. 23, 2018) – Staff at The Artesian Hotel, Casino and Spa are preparing to deck the halls in anticipation of the 5th annual Classic Christmas celebration. The event, which runs throughout the holiday season, will feature lights and decorations, Breakfast with Santa, live reindeer, a Christmas Ball, carriage rides and more.

“Christmas is a magical time at The Artesian Hotel and in the city of Sulphur, and we strive each year to create an experience that is truly one-of-a-kind,” said Justin Williams, Artesian area general manager. “The Classic Christmas celebration is a way for families to start new holiday traditions and make memories that will last a lifetime.”

Holiday festivities begin at 4 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 24 with the community’s Christmas in Sulphur celebration. Christmas in Sulphur will include music, entertainment, food trucks and more, followed by a Christmas Parade of Lights and the Official Lighting Ceremony when The Artesian and other downtown businesses switch on their elaborate light displays.

More than 150,000 LED lights will outline The Artesian’s traditional spires and turrets while more than two-dozen Christmas trees fill the inside of the hotel, including a grand 20-foot tree at the hotel’s entrance.

On Dec. 8 and 15, Santa will fly in from the North Pole for breakfast with his fans from 8–10:30 a.m. each day. Breakfast with Santa reservations includes a hot breakfast served in the ballroom and an opportunity to meet and snap a photo with Santa. A 4×6 portrait will be included, with the option to buy more prints online.  In addition, live reindeer will greet guests from 8 a.m. to noon both days. Seats are $25 per person or $250 per table of 10. Reservations are required.

New this year, The Artesian Ballroom will host a Christmas Ball on Dec. 22 from 8 p.m. to midnight. The Christmas Ball will feature holiday décor, a dance floor and holiday music performed by Aubrey Anna. The Christmas Ball is free, but reservations are highly encouraged.

Two Fridays and Saturdays in December will feature visits from carolers and Mrs. Claus. Carolers dressed in Victorian garb will entertain guests from 4 to 8 p.m. Dec. 7-8 and Dec. 14-15. Mrs. Claus will also visit The Artesian on those days to sit by the fireplace and read stories from 6 to 8 p.m.

Horse-drawn carriages will offer tours through downtown Sulphur and its numerous light displays on Friday and Saturday evenings beginning Dec. 7 and running through the weekend before Christmas. Tickets are $40 per carriage ride. As carriages vary in size, reservations are required.

In The Artesian’s lobby, hotel guests can also treat themselves to milk and cookies from Santa from 7 to 9 p.m. each Friday and Saturday in December leading up to Christmas. Complimentary hot cocoa and apple cider will also be available.

The Chickasaw National Recreation Area’s Historic Candlelight Tour is scheduled for Dec. 7-8 and will take visitors on a walking tour of Flower Park, which will be decorated with more than 1,000 candlelit luminaries. The tours take approximately one hour and will begin at 6 p.m. with the last tour starting at 9 p.m. The tour is free, but reservations are required and can be made by calling the Travertine Nature Center at 580-622-7234.

While visiting The Artesian, guests also have the opportunity to pose behind an oversized picture frame to commemorate their stay. Visitors are encouraged to share and tag photos with the hashtag #TistheArtesian on social media.

“The holidays are a special time at The Artesian and we love sharing the joy of the season with our guests,” Williams said. “The lights, decorations and all of the holiday activities set the scene for a perfect family holiday outing. We hope you can join us.”

To make reservations for Breakfast with Santa, the Christmas Ball and carriage rides, call 855-455-5255. For more information or to book a room at The Artesian, visit www.artesianhotel.com. An official calendar of events is below.

 

Date Event Time
Nov. 24 Christmas in Sulphur, Downtown Sulphur 4 p.m.
Dec. 7-8

 

 

Dec. 7-8

Dec. 14-15

Dec. 21-22

Chickasaw National Recreation Area Candlelight Tours,

Chickasaw Visitor Center

 

Carriage Rides, Sweet Swirlz at The Artesian

6-9 p.m.

 

6-10 p.m.

Dec. 8 and 15 Breakfast with Santa, The Artesian Ballroom 8-10:30 a.m.
Dec. 7-8

Dec. 14-15

 

Carolers serenading guests, The Artesian Lobby 4-8 p.m.
Dec. 7-8

Dec. 14-15

 

Storytime with Mrs. Claus 6-8 p.m.
Dec. 22 Christmas Ball, The Artesian Ballroom 8 p.m. to midnight

Terral to Celebrate All School Reunion

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The biennial Terral All School Reunion will be held on Saturday, October 6, 2018, on the grounds of the Terral Community Center.  Registration will begin at 10:00 AM with lunch being served at 12:00 noon.  Note:  Class pictures will be taken at 11:00 AM again this year.  Be sure to tell everyone you see who is associated in any way with Terral School or Union Valley to come early and join us that day. 

Lunch will be catered again this year and you will need a reservation.  Reservations MUST be received no later than September 21, along with a check for $12.00 per meal.

Due to very generous donations the Terral Alumni Association was proud to award four $1,500 scholarships and one $529 scholarship in 2017, and four $2,500 scholarships in 2018.  The scholarships go to deserving persons who reside in the Terral school district, to assist them in continuing their education.  Selling brass nametags for the memorial plaques also assists in funding the scholarships.  The brass nametags are available for $20 and the plaques are permanently displayed in the Terral Community Center.

Please remember there is no membership fee charged to anyone.  The All School Reunion is funded every two years solely on the donations of people who love Terral School and want to enjoy the fellowship of visiting and remembering old times.

If you would like to contribute to the scholarship fund or assist with reunion expenses, you can include that on the registration form, even if you are unable to attend. 

We plan to tour Terral School again this year.  Raffle information is enclosed.      

We hope to see you on October 6th.

A Registration Form can be found in this week’s paper!

If you have questions or need additional information call or email:

Ronnie Ewing @ 940-928-2278 or ronnie.ewing@sbcglobal.net   

Karen Gunter @ 580-437-2347 or karengunter.1950@gmail.com 

Make Plans to Attend the Terral Reunion This Weekend

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The biennial Terral All School Reunion will be held on Saturday, October 6, 2018, on the grounds of the Terral Community Center.  Registration will begin at 10:00 AM with lunch being served at 12:00 noon.  Note:  Class pictures will be taken at 11:00 AM again this year.  Be sure to tell everyone you see who is associated in any way with Terral School or Union Valley to come early and join us that day. 

Lunch will be catered again this year and you will need a reservation.  Reservations MUST be received no later than September 21, along with a check for $12.00 per meal.

Due to very generous donations the Terral Alumni Association was proud to award four $1,500 scholarships and one $529 scholarship in 2017, and four $2,500 scholarships in 2018.  The scholarships go to deserving persons who reside in the Terral school district, to assist them in continuing their education.  Selling brass nametags for the memorial plaques also assists in funding the scholarships.  The brass nametags are available for $20 and the plaques are permanently displayed in the Terral Community Center.

Please remember there is no membership fee charged to anyone.  The All School Reunion is funded every two years solely on the donations of people who love Terral School and want to enjoy the fellowship of visiting and remembering old times.

If you would like to contribute to the scholarship fund or assist with reunion expenses, you can include that on the registration form, even if you are unable to attend. 

We plan to tour Terral School again this year.  Raffle information is enclosed.      

We hope to see you on October 6th.

If you have questions or need additional information call or email:

Ronnie Ewing @ 940-928-2278 or ronnie.ewing@sbcglobal.net   

Karen Gunter @ 580-437-2347 or karengunter.1950@gmail.com 

OU Institute for Quality Communities Visits Waurika

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 You may have seen several groups of unfamiliar faces wandering up and down Waurika’s Main Street over the course of 3 days last week and wondered what they were up to.

No, they weren’t from the tax office looking to raise your bill. They weren’t investors looking to buy Main Street. But they definitely DID come to invest in Waurika! 

Staff members of the University of Oklahoma’s Institute for Quality Communities and design students from the Gibbs College of Architecture brought their considerable observation, design and analysis talents to downtown to engage with our community as a unique part of our ongoing Waurika rejuvenation efforts. And engage they did!

The visits began last Tuesday as 7 team members arrived at the Main St. office of Brickstreet South, Jacob Eck’s website and graphic design studio. After brief introductions, the group of 3 IQC staff members, 4 design students and Chamber board members Jacob Eck and Lauren Nitschke launched out on a 75 minute walking tour of Main Street that included our new Farmers Market space, The Lawn, the County Courthouse and Sorosis Park. Our visitors were particularly intrigued by our local ranch-sponsored benches, the large metalwork cattle mural on the north face of Sorosis Park and by our art deco inspired, and largely original, 1931 Courthouse. Interestingly, architect Ron Frantz noted that one of the architects listed on the cornerstone was also involved in the design of the Oklahoma State Capitol building!

Following a lunch meeting at the Circle D Café where several community stake-holders gathered to share their thoughts about various downtown planning subjects, the OU group returned to Jacob’s office to begin compiling comments and observations into meaningful topics for the evening’s public workshop at City Hall.

The workshop did not disappoint! Over a dozen residents convened Tuesday evening for a lively session filled with opportunities to learn more about our downtown from “fresh eyes”, and to participate in several interactive work areas where topics included everything from fleshing out information about our calendar of community events, to voicing opinions about favorite places to enjoy downtown, to what we see as real needs on Main Street and beyond. The evening concluded with reports from several attendees who had been led on a quick tour of our outdoor downtown gathering places during the meeting time. There was so much to be shared, it was challenging to bring our conversations to a close for the night!

Wednesday morning, the IQC group huddled again in the Brickstreet South office, working feverishly on their lunchtime presentation at Doc’s Place to another group of stakeholders. They presented relevant statistics such as daily traffic counts on Highways 70 and 81 (over 3000 vehicles each!) and how many residents live and work in Waurika versus those who live here and work elsewhere and vice versa. Maps and overlays were shared, as well as numerous photos, sketches and interesting observations about our beautiful town. Attendees were informed of the next steps the IQC study group will be taking toward the goal of presenting their findings and recommendations at a public meeting in early 2019.

Round 2 of IQC’s Waurika study took place on Saturday morning as 28 Environmental Design and City Planning students plus 2 of the same IQC staffers arrived on Main Street to undertake a unique historic building architectural survey. It began with the large contingent touring 4 blocks of Main Street with Jacob Eck and Lauren Nitschke providing historical context and other information about many of the buildings. Several downtown building owners were so generous to allow the team access inside their properties and the group was delighted by what they found: high ceilings with other design features that allowed for natural air flow, original, stained wood trim, high light-emitting transom windows on storefronts that had long since been covered over with huge awning structures, gorgeous wood floors and cavernous spaces just waiting for new uses.

The group was also treated to the Brickstreet Classic Car Show taking place on the north end of Main, along with the accompanying burger lunch and Volunteer Fire Departments’ BBQ Cook-Off. 

The architectural survey work took place after lunch with the team breaking into small groups targeting the various structures. The results of their survey 

work and extensive historical research will also be presented early next year and will provide the type of documentation necessary if Waurika leaders and property owners decide to pursue state and national historic designation opportunities. 

Another benefit of IQC’s partnership with Waurika is their ability to help us locate and match grant possibilities to our unique architectural and city planning situations. We look forward with great anticipation and excitement to their upcoming presentation next year and are very grateful for the encouragement and help they are providing our community. 

Waurikans can be very proud of the efforts undertaken over previous months in our town to make such a positive impression on this large group of design- and historically-savvy individuals. It was heard quite a few times over the past week the enthusiastic exclamations of “I want to live here!” and “This is such a cool town!”. As the final day wrapped up, doctoral candidate Petya Stefanoff lavished praise on Waurika’s progress so far on creating a beautiful city and our ability to work together so well toward the greater goal of “community”. She further encouraged us by exclaiming, “Keep up the good work, Waurika!” 

And with our amazing community of creative, energetic and involved residents, we’ll do just that!

 

Cameron University to present Disability Awareness Fair

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Cameron University will present the 11th Annual Disability Awareness Fair on Thursday, October 4, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the McCasland Ballroom, located in the McMahon Centennial Complex on the Cameron campus. The event is open to the public at no charge. The Disability Awareness fair will inform participants about services and resources available on campus and in the community for persons with disabilities.

 

The Disability Awareness fair will feature interactive stations where participants can learn more about disabilities such as visual impairments or learning disabilities in reading comprehension. In addition, various community organizations that provide services and support to those with disabilities will be present to share information and answer questions.  Cameron’s annual disability awareness event is an opportunity for students, faculty, staff and members of the community to gain an understanding of what it means to live with a disability.

 

For more information, contact the Office of Student Development at 580-581-2209 or via email at student_development@cameron.edu.

Ana Gomez Receives Scholarship Award

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 Red River Technology Center Practical Nursing student Ana Gomez (right), of Waurika, was recently awarded the Martha Ann Overstreet Nursing Scholarship. The scholarship, worth $500, was awarded by Jodie Roberts (left), the granddaughter of Overstreet.

Voter Registration Deadline: Jan 18

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 Friday, January 18, is the last day to apply for voter registration in order to be eligible to vote in the February 12 Temple School District  Special Election Day, Jefferson County Election Board Secretary Tammy Richardson said today.

Richardson said that persons who are United States citizens, residents of Oklahoma, and at least 18 years old may apply to become registered voters.

Those who aren’t registered or need to change their registration may apply by filling out and mailing an Oklahoma Voter Registration Application form in time for it to be postmarked no later than midnight Friday, January 18.

Richardson said applications postmarked after that time will be accepted and processed, but not until after February 12.

The County Election Board responds in writing to every person who submits an application for voter registration.  The response is either a voter identification card listing the new voter’s precinct number and polling place location or a letter that explains the reason or reasons the application for voter registration was not approved.  Richardson said any person who has submitted a voter registration application and who has not received a response within 30 days should contact the County Election Board office.

Oklahoma Voter Registration Application forms are available at the County Election Board office located at 220 N. Main St., Rm #203, Waurika, OK, and at most post offices, tag agencies and public libraries in the county. Applications also are available at www.elections.ok.gov.

Chickasaw weapons-maker to Hollywood authors book

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TISHOMINGO, Okla. – Historically accurate craftsmanship of Native American weapons has made Chickasaw citizen Eric Smith recognized among Hollywood movie-makers.

In December, he will add another accomplishment to his resumé – published author.

“The Warriors tools: Plains Indian bows, arrows and quivers” will hit bookstores and retail businesses Dec. 4. It is published by Roadrunner Press.

“I am very excited about it. Roadrunner Press is out of Oklahoma City and has published many Native American-themed books,” Smith said. “It is written from a Native American perspective. So many books concerning (Native American) history are written by Europeans and they had a completely different perspective from that of Native people,” he added.

Smith most recently found nationwide acclaim for crafting Native weaponry for the Oscar-winning movie “The Revenant.” The 2016 motion picture was nominated for a dozen Oscars, taking home three; Best Actor, Best Cinematography and Best Director.

He is still crafting weapons for movies but is unable to say much about his endeavors until studios and movie executives are ready to make announcements.

For Children

The book is written at a high school level and Smith’s greatest desire is to make it available to students. Children are the keys to preserving Native culture, in Smith’s opinion.

“The things that we do, our cultural ways, they must continue. The key to that is reaching children. We must inspire our youth or we are in trouble,” Smith intoned, adding “with everything I do, I try to inspire our younger generations to take up some of these techniques.”

“As a youth, when I was learning to make Native weapons, people were telling me ‘this is irrelevant’ and ‘there is no use for these things in the modern world.’ Well, I am a walking testament that isn’t true. Here are these ancient methods so needed and highly sought after today,” Smith said. “That just shows the relevance of our people and our culture.”

He has been crafting Native weapons since age nine. That is when he made his first bow. “No, it wasn’t a very good one,” Smith recalls with a sly grin, “but I was so proud because it actually worked.” By the time Smith entered his teens, his craft was honed to such a high degree he was asked to make bows for friends and for hunters.

The Next Level

Making weapons came naturally to Smith, but a curiosity nagged his soul. Not only did he wish to make quality weapons, but he also wanted them to be historically and culturally pure.

For guidance, he turned to Native elders and made frequent road trips to consult with them.

“Elders always have a story to tell. If you sit down with an elder, listen and let them talk to you, it is amazing the information they will share. Everywhere I went, whether it was Pine Ridge (South Dakota Oglala Lakota) or Tuba City in the Navajo Nation, I listened and learned.”

With the visits came an epiphany – all ancient cultures worldwide used archery.

No culture, however, excelled at it like Native Americans.

In the book, Smith devotes two chapters to weapons made from the horns/antlers and sinew of animals. “Native Americans made some of the most complex bows in the history of the world,” Native American “horn bows” are among them.

“Mountain sheep horns, elk antlers, caribou antlers, and sinew were all used. I’ve replicated many of those bows. For me, it was a lot of trial and error and a lot of mistakes. For our people to figure out this complicated technology, it is almost unbelievable,” Smith explained. “It shows great skill, great ingenuity, and dedication to work with material available to them in their natural environment. So, I share that knowledge in the book for people who want to try to do it.”

Winning the Battle

Smith is an expert in Native American weaponry. He has successfully replicated all kinds of weapons from many different tribes, including his own tribe. However, his specialty is weapons of Plains Indians at around the time they acquired horses. Most historians put the date at around 1680, following the Pueblo Revolt.

He was recently a trifecta winner at the Southeastern Art Show and Market (SEASAM) sponsored by the Chickasaw Nation during its Annual Meeting and Festival celebration. Smith entered two categories and placed three times – first place in cultural clothing; second place in weaponry and third place in cultural clothing.

Sometime in the near future, he will move from his Lawton home to Pauls Valley. He has spent a year restoring a home once owned by a family member who is now deceased.

Sharing his knowledge, research, philosophy, and skills appeal to Smith because the book “will be around forever.”

Eric Smith greets visitors from his booth at the Southeastern Art Show and Market during the 2018 Chickasaw Nation Annual Meeting and Festival.

“It took about four months to write the book,” he said. “I did some research to make sure all the facts were correct, but primarily I wrote about what I have learned from elders and by doing it. I had friends read the manuscript and they said ‘it makes me want to build a bow,’” he said. “And, I consider that a great compliment.”

“The Warriors tools: Plains Indian bows, arrows, and quivers” will be available on Amazon, Barnes and Noble and other major bookstores. Amazon will make the book available for Kindle download.

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